christianmonotheism  resources   get involved   contact us   podcast
Calling Christians Worldwide to Return to the Creed of Jesus

Displaying All Media (373 items)

Paganistic False Views of God  [93]
by Paul Johnson rated at 4.8 (3 votes so far)

This is chapter 8 of the book, God, which is the first book in the series, Epiphany Studies in the Scriptures, in which Paul Johnson writes about polytheism, coequality, and the trinity. He contends that the trinity is a heresy.

Analyzing James White's Trinity Definition  [8:41]
by Sean Holbrook rated at 4.5 (5 votes so far)

Sean examines James White's definition of the trinity and concludes that his error occurs when White names a nature instead of a person. Although short, this video will help you see exactly why the Trinity model doesn't work. More YouTube videos by Sean Halbrook available here.

John 1:1 and the Trinity  [48:11]
by Anthony Buzzard rated at 4.1 (25 votes so far)

The first verse of the Gospel of John is almost always used as a starting point to prove the Trinity. However, is there another way to understand John 1.1? Was John, a first century Jew, articulating the completely non-Jewish idea that God became a human being or have we read that into John 1.1? Join Anthony Buzzard as he explains the meaning of John 1.1-14 in its original Hebrew, thought context.

Unitarian Trailblazers  [59:50]
by Sean Finnegan rated at 4.0 (3 votes so far)

Learn about the biblical unitarian trailblazers of the 1500s, including Claude of Savoy, Adam Pastor, and Michael Servetus. Discover how they fearlessly tried to convert Martin Luther and John Calvin. Hear about their heroic lives and, in the case of Servetus, tragic death.

The Socinian Movement  [40:30]
by Sean Finnegan rated at 4.0 (3 votes so far)

Learn about the Italian, Polish, and Hungarian unitarian groups of the 16th and 17th centuries. Find out how they started under Faustus Socinus, Peter Gonesius, and Ferenc David. Derive inspiration from their courageous stand against persecution in a tumultuous political time.

Why the Trinity Doctrine Doesn't Make Sense: 5 Reasons   [8:15]
by Nathan Crowder rated at 3.9 (22 votes so far)

The Challenge: Will you ask these five questions of your pastor or trusted Christian expert? Most people just believe in the Trinity because that is how they were raised. Tradition has been passed down from generation to generation and no one seems to be asking whether or not this doctrine is biblical. If you care about this subject, if this is important to you, if you want to know who God really is, then you owe it to yourself to wrestle with these questions. Print off the questions at christianmonotheism.com/questions

Who is Jesus? (Booklet)  [25 pages]
by Anthony Buzzard rated at 3.9 (20 votes so far)

It is a striking fact that Jesus never referred to himself as "God." Equally remarkable is the New Testament's use of the word "God"--in Greek ho theos--to refer to the Father alone, some 1325 times. In sharp contrast, Jesus is called "god" in a handful of texts only--perhaps no more than two. Why this impressive difference in New Testament usage, when so many seem to think that Jesus is no less "God" than his Father?

Debate: Unitarian vs. Trinitarian  [117:52]
by Sean Finnegan vs. Brant Bosserman rated at 3.8 (30 votes so far)

Presented by Brant Bosserman and Sean Finnegan at the One God Conference, in Seattle, WA on June 1st 2008. The debate was over whether God is a single individual (the Father of Jesus) or if he is a Trinity (three persons in one essence). The debate followed this format:

Introduction by Ken Westby and Tom Bosserman [10 min]

Sean's Opening Statement [20 min]
Brant's Opening Statement [20 min]

Sean's Rebuttal [15 min]
Brant's Rebuttal [15 min]

Sean Cross-Examine Brant [10 min]
Brant Cross-Examine Sean [10 min]

Sean's Closing Statement [5 min]
Brant's Closing Statement [5 min]

The discussion was lively and considerate and I thank Brant for his willingness to engage us on this issue. Unfortunately the recording has some microphone interference during the concluding statements but most of what was said can be understood. Sorry for the inconvenience.

The Human Jesus (Documentary)  [119:26]
by M. G. Dockery rated at 3.6 (17 votes so far)

Who was the historical Jesus? Was he God in the flesh or the long awaited human Messiah of the Jews? Watch this documentary to find out what the controversy is all about. If the earliest followers of Jesus believed him to be the Jewish Messiah (the human born to save the world) how is it the case that twenty centuries later one is labeled a heretic if he or she does not affirm the doctrine of the Trinity? This documentary seeks to get investigate what happened to the original understanding of Jesus. History combines with interviews from Christian, Jewish, and Muslim scholars along with a number of "man on the street" segments to weave together a remarkable tapestry with staggering implications. Produced by Restoration Fellowship in conjunction M. G. Dockery Films. If you prefer to download the video rather than watch it on Google-Video, click here for high quality (230 mb or click here for low quality (75 mb).

The Problem of the Trinity  [13 pages]
by David Kemball-Cook rated at 3.6 (4 votes so far)

It is the thesis of this paper that there is no viable route between modalism and tritheism for a Trinity defined in the ways that theologians have attempted. There is no internally consistent way of defining or explaining a Trinity which does not result in shipwreck either on the ‘Scylla’ of modalism or in the ‘Charybdis’ of tritheism. There are three ambiguities and confusions in the attempted definitions of the Trinity which have tended to obscure these difficulties.

Five Major Problems with the Trinity  [65:29]
by Sean Finnegan rated at 3.6 (16 votes so far)

Why are so many Bible-believing Christians coming to question and abandon the Trinity in favor of more scriptural approaches to understanding God? Listen to this audio and hear five of the many major problems with the Trinity.

The Trinity Defined and Refuted  [73:25]
by Sean Finnegan rated at 3.5 (16 votes so far)

Sean Finnegan describes and refutes the belief of three persons in one godhead including a systematic brief treatment of their co-equal, co-eternal, co-essential nature, and the hypostatic union. Does the Trinity make sense? Is the dogma biblical? Join this tour de force through early Church history and the relevant theological constructs of Christianity's most controversial doctrine.

Losing Faith in the Trinity  [79:57]
by Christopher Amelung rated at 3.5 (16 votes so far)

Christopher Amelung was raised as an informed evangelical thinker within the Reformed tradition. When he went off to college he met someone who challenged him on his belief in the Trinity. Though, he was confident at the time in his "orthodox" position, he decided to do the research necessary to prove to this person that the Trinity was true from the Bible. This began Christopher on a quest, through which, he lost friendships, was told he would burn in hell, and even was urged by an elder to "just believe in the Trinity and be confused with the rest of us." Listen to his riveting autobiographical account of how God is able to reach someone who is open to hearing his truth no matter what the cost.

The NT Teaches that God Is One  [12 pages]
by Chuck LaMattina rated at 3.5 (16 votes so far)

For many Christians this belief in the Trinity is the acid test for real faith. There is only one problem with this acid test, however. Nowhere does the Bible ever claim that God is a Trinity of persons. As we saw from the last chapter the Old Testament states that there is only one God and one person who is God. The great creed of Old Testament faith was, "Hear, O Israel, the LORD our God, the LORD is one!"

Commentary on John 1.1-3  [6 pages]
by Chuck LaMattina rated at 3.4 (17 votes so far)

The word, the logos, God's plan, His purpose, became flesh and dwelt among us. With the coming into existence of Jesus Christ at his conception and birth, the full plan and heart of God was expressed as a human being. Jesus Christ was full of divine grace and truth. What became flesh in John 1.14 was not a preexistent or eternally begotten Son of God. What became flesh was God's full plan of salvation revealed in the Man Jesus Christ.

Jesus is My Lord and My God (John 20.28)  [65:06]
by Sean Finnegan rated at 3.4 (15 votes so far)

As biblical unitarians we believe that "Jesus is God," however we do not affirm that Jesus is deity. How is this possible? In the Bible, humans are sometimes called "God." This is because they represent God to the people (either well or poorly). When Jesus is called "God" twice in the New Testament it is because he is authorized as God's agent, not because he is himself divine. Listen or read this item to expose yourself to a thorough and well documented approach to two of the most difficult verses in the New Testament (John 20.28 and Hebrews 1.8).

The OT Teaches that God Is One  [9 pages]
by Chuck LaMattina rated at 3.3 (14 votes so far)

There is only one true God and one person who is God. All Christians agree that there is only one true God. But all Christians do not agree on whom precisely that one God is. Millions of Christians profess that God is a Trinity of persons. They have been told that God consists of three distinct persons, the Father, Son and Holy Spirit, who together make up one God. Yet, the Old Testament adamantly and clearly teaches that God is a single individual.

Debate: Is God One or Three in One?  [143:07]
by Sean Finnegan vs. Russ Dizdar rated at 3.3 (18 votes so far)

Sean Finnegan and Russ Dizdar participate in a debate over the question of who God is. Mr. Finnegan took the affirmative position that the Father is the only true God (cf. Jn 17.3) and Mr. Dizdar, took the traditional position that God is three persons in one essence--the Trinity. The tone was very civil and both sides were able to present their positions.

Unfortunately, the moderator, GeorgeAnn Hughes (founder of The Byte Show) was not able to participate very much because she was having some trouble with her voice. As a result, the participants had to keep track of their own time and took turns presenting their cases. The format of the debate was as follows:

Opening Statements
20 minutes -- Sean Finnegan
20 minutes -- Russ Dizdar

Rebuttals
15 minutes -- Sean Finnegan
15 minutes -- Russ Dizdar

Direct Question and Answers
approximately an hour

If you would like to get in on the discussion visit this blog entry.

On the Errors of the Trinity  [12 mp3s]
by Don Snedeker rated at 3.3 (15 votes so far)

A thorough consideration and refutation of the doctrine of the Trinity. Originally released as 12 tapes but now available on mp3, this series examines the doctrine of the Trinity proposition by proposition. Not only is this series approached from a biblical perspective, Don Snedeker also taps into the rich biblical unitarian resources of several authors from the 19th century. Furthermore, Don works through a number of texts typically used to support the Trinity and he demonstrates their true meaning based on their context. Click on the audio icon above to see the titles for each of the 12 mp3s in this comprehensive examination.

To God be the Glory (My Story)  [35:17]
by Joel Hemphill rated at 3.3 (13 votes so far)

This audio file documents the journey of a famed gospel singer, Joel Hemphill, from 'Jesus Only' to 'Father Only' understanding of God. Listen to this testimony of a man to whom God revealed himself in an extraordinary way.

The Shema: The Creed of Jesus  [47:10]
by Sean Finnegan rated at 3.2 (13 votes so far)

The central creed of the Old Testament is that Yahweh our God is one. Jesus held this as his creed and so should we today. The Trinity is an affront to biblical monotheism and seeks to change the 'one' into 'three.' This is not an option if we want to be like Jesus who said that the Father is the only true God

God and Jesus: An Overview  [46:54]
by Sean Finnegan rated at 3.2 (13 votes so far)

The Bible teaches that Yahweh alone is the true God. Yahweh is a singular individual who created all things. Jesus is the human Messiah, virginally begotten and commissioned by God to rule the world. This brief overview of the two main individuals in the Bible clarifies the true identity of God and Jesus. To download the slide show that accompanies this sermon, click here.

Proud of our God  [67:46]
by Victor Gluckin rated at 3.2 (13 votes so far)

An honest appeal for zealousness in understanding and proclaiming our one God to the nations. Let us not cower nor be lifted up with pride, but with compassion preach with boldness that God is a singular individual--the Father of Jesus Christ.

From Oneness to One  [43:16]
by J. Dan Gill rated at 3.2 (14 votes so far)

The testimony of a man who studied himself out of the Oneness belief about God and into the view that Jesus is human and his Father is God. This story is riveting, well-told, and worth listening to, whether or not you are familiar oneness doctrine.

The Great Shift away from Jewish Roots (Truth Matters)  [28:06]
by Alex Hall rated at 3.2 (12 votes so far)

Alex Hall of London, UK, describes with gusto and detail how the early Christian movement shifted away from the Hebrew mindset as it was persecuted in its native land and driven out into the Greco-Roman world. Alex bases his commentary on volume one of the German church historian Adolf Harnack's tome called History of Dogma. (Accessible online at ccel.org)

Listen in as Alex discusses the major reasons why Christianity began to shift its thinking towards Greek philosophy and how important it is that we be informed about this great shift.

The Arian Controversy (Truth Matters)  [28:06]
by Alex Hall rated at 3.2 (12 votes so far)

Alex Hall of London tells the story of how the church vacillated between Arius and Athanasius during the fourth century. By focusing on the dueling councils during that period (a.d. 318-381) Alex paints a picture, which, although disturbing to those of us who would like to think that such matters as the deity of Christ were always clear, accurately describes how politics heavily influenced the development of theology during that time. A good deal of Alex's work was influenced by When Jesus Became God by Richard Rubenstein. If this conversation has piqued your interest in this subject I highly recommend reading Rubenstein's book as it fills out the details in a readable manner. Alex's conclusion is that we should not trust either side since both used ungodly means to achieve their goal of winning the debate, rather, we should practice the Berean exercise of searching the Scriptures to see whether these things are so (Acts 17.11).

Is God Really One What?  [60:44]
by Anthony Buzzard rated at 3.1 (14 votes so far)

The Trinity has been defined as three 'who's' in one 'what.' Is this biblical? Should God be defined as a 'what' when everywhere in Scripture he is referred to using singular personal pronouns?

Let Us Make Man: A Study of the "Us Texts"  [42:55]
by Sean Finnegan rated at 3.1 (12 votes so far)

Who was God talking to in Genesis 1.26; 3.21; 11.7; Isaiah 6.8? Should these four texts be used to support the notion that within God are multiple persons? Sean Finnegan demonstrates conclusively that this is simply not the case. Through careful examination of relevant passages and by quoting leading trinitarian study Bibles one simple conclusion emerges: God says "us" in the same sense that "us" is used in any other context--he refers to himself and others (members of his heavenly court).

Unitarianism Explained and Defended  [183:08]
by Anthony Buzzard rated at 3.0 (16 votes so far)

Anthony Buzzard presents the biblical unitarian position and then answers questions from trinitarians for more than two hours. Listen in to an invigorating dialogue that covers most of the big questions that perennially surface in this type of conversation.

Debate: Bible Answer Program w/ Bill Blount  [72:49]
by Christadelphians vs. Gospel Truth Ministries rated at 3.0 (13 votes so far)

Two Christadelphians vs two men from The Gospel Truth Ministries debate the Trinity on the Bible Answer Program with Bill Blount (a call-in radio program).

Is the Trinity Biblical? (Truth Matters)  [28:06]
by Patrick Navas rated at 3.0 (11 votes so far)

Patrick Navas has been a Bible student for the last fourteen years--ever since one of the Gideons handed him a free pocket New Testament and he was gripped by John 3.16. In his quest to understand Christianity he quickly learned that there were quite a few differences between various groups which all claimed to have the truth. This propelled Patrick into long years of study as he researched the biggest question of all--who is God?

The result of that work was his 2006 book titled Divine Truth or Human Tradition?: A Reconsideration of the Roman Catholic-Protestant Doctrine of the Trinity in Light of the Hebrew and Christian Scriptures. His book not only lays out the clear biblical teaching about God, but it also interacts with top trinitarian defenders such as Dr. James R. White, John MacArthur, Dr. Wayne Grudem, Robert Bowman Jr., Dr. Robert Morey, Dr. R. C. Sproul, and others. Patrick defends his position with cogency and humility as he enumerates the reasons why the Trinity is not a biblical doctrine.

Who or What is the Holy Spirit?  [12 pages]
by Sean Finnegan rated at 3.0 (11 votes so far)

Sean Finnegan surveys both Old and New Testaments in an effort to understand the holy spirit free from the straitjacket of trinitarian dogma.

Debate: On The Narrow Mind Call-In Show  [119:48]
by Dan Mages & Patrick Navas vs. Gene Cook rated at 2.9 (16 votes so far)

Dan Mages and Patrick Navas engage Gene Cook (the DJ) on the Trinity. Both sides do a fine job of talking about the reasons why they hold to their positions.

Trinity Discussion on London Radio  [22:07]
by Alex Hall rated at 2.9 (14 votes so far)

Listen to this fast-paced London call in radio show discussion about the Trinity. Alex Hall (theocrat) ably answers many questions while asserting that God is one not three. You can visit Alex's website at GodFellas.org.

John 1.1 (An Unitarian Perspective)  [26:10]
by Dustin Smith rated at 2.9 (14 votes so far)

Dustin Smith cogently exegetes John 1.1 from a biblical unitarian perspective (i.e. non-literal pre-existence). Taken from the 2005 Theological Conference in Atlanta, Georgia.

20 Reasons Why the Doctrine of the Trinity is Unbiblical  [21 pages]
by Chuck LaMattina rated at 2.9 (11 votes so far)

Chuck LaMattina lays out twenty biblical reasons explaining why the Trinity is incorrect. Such a collection may be just the thing to send to a friend or family member to help them see that there is an issue here worth discussing.

Shaliah: An Introduction to the Law of Agency  [15 pages]
by Raymond James Essoe rated at 2.9 (11 votes so far)

A common feature of the Hebrew Scriptures is the concept (some even call it the "law") of Jewish agency. All Old Testament scholars and commentators recognize that in Jewish custom whenever a superior commissioned an agent to act on his behalf, the agent was regarded as the person himself. Without this understanding we may unintentionally misread texts that refer to Jesus as God.

The Plan of God: Jesus  [34:17]
by Dave Hixon rated at 2.8 (12 votes so far)

Who was Jesus of Nazareth? Where did he come from? Who was he? What is his true identity? How does God's plan relate to Jesus? Was he just a teacher, a wise man, or a Jewish scholar? Or is there more too it than that? Pastor Dave guides us in the first message of two explaining and understanding one of the greatest, most controversial, and most crucial topics in all of Christianity.

The Holy Spirit and Translation Bias (1)  [48:42]
by Sean Finnegan rated at 2.8 (10 votes so far)

Sean Finnegan points out several Scriptures where translators intentionally altered the Bible in order to make it fit their traditional doctrine about the holy spirit. Notes available at http://www.christianmonotheism.com/media/text/Sean%20Finnegan%20--%20Translating%20the%20Holy%20Spirit%201.pdf

Christ the Firstborn Head of the Universe  [78:23]
by Nathan Crowder rated at 2.8 (13 votes so far)

Jesus is the highest exalted man in the universe. Does this mean that he must be God? He is the beginning and creator of the new creation.

The Creed of Jesus  [31:09]
by Dustin Smith rated at 2.8 (12 votes so far)

Dustin demonstrates the simple Creed of Jesus evolved into what is recanted in most churches today. The exhortation is for the followers of Jesus to return to his creed and thereby returning to his definition of who God is.

Theos  [47:40]
by Steve Katsaras rated at 2.8 (12 votes so far)

This teaching begins from where Elohim left off, by studying the NT usage of the Greek word Theos, translated in English, God. Again, what is seen here is a continuing trend that was realized in the OT usage of Elohim - Theos is also flexibly used for the One true God, for angels, men, etc...The exegetical study of the word properly reveals who the God of Israel is. (This sermon was originally preached at the Red Words Church on 6-June-2010 in Melbourne, Australia.)

Who is Jesus  [251:02]
by Anthony Buzzard rated at 2.7 (10 votes so far)

Many churchgoers have been schooled to flee from anyone claiming that "Jesus is not God." But very few have contemplated the implications of what it means that both the Father can be God and Jesus God, also. Two who are fully God makes two Gods. The Bible warns against the fatal mistake of saying that there is more than one who is God. Jesus claimed that "the Father is the only who is truly God' (John 17:3), and made this the main plank of his teaching about eternal life. Are you sure you have understood Jesus and his creed? It never hurts to review these basic truths. Nothing is lost by hearing other points of view. Anthony proposes with many scholars, past and present, that the notion that "Jesus is God" goes beyond the Bible. Rather Jesus is the Messiah, the Son of God (Matt. 16:16-18). You will find these discussion valuable as a searcher for truth in a confused world.

Is It Necessary to Believe in the Trinity to Be Saved?  [51:59]
by J. Dan Gill rated at 2.7 (10 votes so far)

Originally titled: Yet Another Music City Miracle. The evangelical gospel does not include confession in the Trinity. If this is the case there are only two options: (1) the Trinity is not necessary for salvation or (2) evangelicals are preaching an incomplete gospel. J. Dan Gill opts for the former in this fine talk on the subject.

Debate: Who Was Jesus? God or Man?   [132:17]
by Anthony Buzzard vs. Drew Ayers rated at 2.7 (12 votes so far)

Anthony Buzzard debates Drew Ayers on Nov. 3, 2007 in Blountstown, Florida on whether God is a Trinity or simply one. Download the video: high quality, low quality

Should Jesus be Worshiped?  [8 pages]
by Sean Finnegan rated at 2.6 (10 votes so far)

The Bible emphatically teaches that Yahweh alone should be worshiped. However there are many times when people worshiped Jesus in the Gospels. Yet we know that Jesus is not Yahweh (Psalm 110.1). How do we resolve this dilemma?

Identity Theft  [49:17]
by Vince Finnegan rated at 2.6 (10 votes so far)

Yahweh's identity as the only true God has been hijacked and replaced with a 3 in 1 impostor. Listen to this stirring sermon.

Commentary on 1 Timothy 3.16  [3 pages]
by Sean Finnegan rated at 2.6 (9 votes so far)

1 Tim. 3:16 is analyzed in detail with reference to standard scholarly resources in order to determine whether or not the text originally read "God was manifested in the flesh" or "He who was manifested in the flesh." The latter reading is defended.

Jesus: Prophet, Messiah, or God?  [118:34]
by Steve Katsaras vs. Bernie Power vs. Shahir Naga rated at 2.6 (9 votes so far)

An evangelical, a unitarian, and a Muslim discuss the identity of Jesus at a forum held in Melbourne, Australia, on 17th July 2013. This was a discussion jointly hosted by City Bible Forum and CrossCulture Church of Christ between three different views on Jesus. The evening started with 8 minute opening statements by each presenter, then moderated discussion followed by a 2 minute closing. A Trinitarian Christian - Dr. Bernie Power (Melbourne School of Theology). A Muslim - Shahir Naga (1God.com.au) A Unitarian Christian - Steve Katsaras (Red Words Church). This is the complete presentation. If the youtube link doesnt work, click here to download the complete video.

Christ Who is the Beginning!  [93:14]
by Z.B. Duncan rated at 2.6 (9 votes so far)

Where does your faith begin? Is it in this world? Is it in man? Is it in yourself? Or is your hope anchored in something greater? How does knowing who Jesus is affect how you live? How does knowing his willing sacrifice for you affect what you're willing to sacrifice for him? (This was part of the revival services at Brush Creek Church of God - November 30, 1972)

Debate: James White vs. Patrick Navas  [189:50]
by Patric Navas vs. James White rated at 2.6 (11 votes so far)

I recently listened to Patrick Navas' debate against James White over whether or not Jesus is God. The specific debate topic was: “The deity of Christ is taught in the following texts or families of texts: John 12:41 (cf. Isa. 6 and 53), 1 Cor. 8:5-6, Heb. 1, Col. 1:15-17, and the 'I am' statements of Jesus (John 8:24/58, 13:19, 18:5-6).” Navas argued for a one-God position whereas White defended the doctrine of the Trinity. These two are among the best advocates of their respective positions.

James White is the Director of Alpha and Omega Ministries and the author of The Forgotten Trinity. White has debate dozens of people on many subjects, including Anthony Buzzard and Greg Stafford on the Trinity. He is tenacious, well-trained at debating, and probably one of the best Trinity defenders in the world.

Patrick Navas is the author of Divine Truth or Human Tradition?: A Reconsideration of the Orthodox Doctrine of the Trinity in Light of the Hebrew and Christian Scriptures. I've listened to a few of Navas' debates and he exemplifies a Christ-like respect and gentleness combined with strength and confidence. If you would like to listen to my own interview with Navas on the subject of the Trinity, click here.

The two faced off on Chris Date's Theopologetics podcast.

part one: opening statements; John 12.41; 1 Corinthians 8.6
part two: Hebrews 1; Colossians 1; the "I Am" statements of John

Does Jesus Have to Be God to Pay for Sin?  [54:30]
by Alex Hall rated at 2.5 (9 votes so far)

Did Jesus need to be God in order to pay for the sins of the world? Could he be a 'mere' man and still atone for all? Alex Hall wrestles with these questions from a biblical perspective in an effort to free us from traditional dogma and bring us closer to the heart of New Testament Christianity and the atonement theology of the first century Christians.

Leaving the Jehovah's Witnesses (Truth Matters)  [28:06]
by Ray Faircloth rated at 2.5 (9 votes so far)

Ray Faircloth was a Jehovah's Witness (JW) for 36 years and served as both a ministerial servant and as an elder. Over his lengthy sojourn among the JWs, he sometimes came across doctrinal issues which he quietly logged in the back of his mind. He also noticed that the Watchtower Society (the organization name of the JWs) was increasing its control over the people. He observed that more and more in meetings loyalty to God's organization was being emphasized whereas loyalty to Jesus was not really talked about.

Listen in to this show to hear the insider perspective of a committed Jehovah's Witness, who never wanted to leave the fold, but who God led to see that the most fundamental doctrine of the Watchtower--that it was God's one true organization--was baseless. Ray has suffered greatly, and two of his three daughters no longer speak to him (JWs practice an extreme form of shunning). If you would like to contact Ray, especially if you have questions related to JWs, please email him: rcfaircloth@msn.com.

Only the Father is God  [3 pages]
by Sean Finnegan rated at 2.5 (9 votes so far)

According to John 17.3 & 1 Corinthians 8.6 there is only one God: the Father. This simple definition of God, although called heresy by most Christians, seems to be the most biblically accurate. Read this article to find out why.

Isaiah 9.6: The Birth of the Royal Heir  [37:08]
by Sean Finnegan rated at 2.4 (9 votes so far)

A detailed exegesis of Isaiah 9.6 in light of its immediate context. Is Jesus prophesied to be the mighty God or is he being spoken of as the mighty God's supreme representative?

Jesus was in the Form of God  [17:11]
by Dustin Smith & J.J. Fletcher rated at 2.4 (10 votes so far)

To be 'in the form' of God has led many to believe that Jesus is God Himself. Is this true? What is Paul trying to tell the reader in Philippians 2 when he identifies Jesus as being 'in the form of God?' Continuing the Exegetical Insights tradition, this episode endeavors to unpack the meaning of this section from the passage itself. (This video is also available on Google Video http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=8141076350056654189&q=source:004275304184530516831&hl=en).

Implications of Monotheism (Truth Matters)  [34:34]
by Danny Dixon rated at 2.3 (8 votes so far)

Danny Dixon is a graduate of Abilene Christian University (1981: B.A. In Biblical Studies, New Testament emphasis; 1984: M.A. in Bible and Related Studies, stressing New Testament text). He has served churches as a Youth Minister in Nevada, Kansas, and California. He has also served as a Campus Evangelist with churches in discipleship ministries with students at Virginia Tech, UCLA, and USC in Los Angeles. In May of 2009 he graduated with a Master of Education in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages from Grand Canyon University in Phoenix, Arizona.

As a minister Danny was sent a copy of Anthony Buzzard's The Doctrine of the Trinity: Christianity's Self-Inflicted Wound and as a result began to question whether or not the doctrine of the Trinity was biblical. He was surprised when two of the elders at the church where he served adamantly discouraged him from even investigating this subject. Nevertheless, the other two elders supported him and Danny pressed on to unravel the mind-numbing nuanced distinctions endemic to the doctrine of the Trinity. After some time, he found the texts which support the ancient Jewish-Christian belief that God is strictly one individual to vastly outweigh the handful of trinitarian proof-texts he used to cling to and he found himself changing his position on the issue.

In our conversation, Danny describes what this process was like and also how shifting from complex "monotheism" to simple monotheism has aided him in following Jesus more closely. If this show interests you, feel free to visit Danny's online discussion forum 4OneGod.net, watch the documentary The Human Jesus, or check out his free downloads from christianmonotheism.com.

Does It Make a Difference?  [36:09]
by Harold Doan rated at 2.3 (8 votes so far)

What separates the Church of God from other Christians? Are the distinctive truths about the unity of God really that important? This was recorded in 1956.

Is Jesus God in John 1.18?  [2 pages]
by Kermit Zarley rated at 2.3 (8 votes so far)

The arguments are about evenly divided for either variant. But the following point is decisive: if John 1.1c, 5.18, 10.30-38, and 20.28 are interpreted as not calling Jesus theos ("God"), then John 1.18 cannot be linked to any corresponding text in this gospel. And linkage is the prologue's purpose. Since ho monogenes huios clearly links to John 3.16 and v. 18, the authentic Greek text of John 1.18 most likely is not monogenes theos but ho monogenes huios, so that it does not call Jesus "God."

The Son Was Given Authority  [2 pages]
by Shane Derry rated at 2.3 (8 votes so far)

Why was Jesus called Immanuel? Does that mean he is God with us or was he being called this name to remind the message that God was still with his people? Looking at other Hebrew names Shane mounts a convincing case for the second option.

Genesis 1.26  [48:56]
by Steve Katsaras rated at 2.3 (8 votes so far)

Steve Katsaras explains Genesis 1.26

Unitarian Monotheism  [51:53]
by Steve Katsaras rated at 2.3 (8 votes so far)

While many agree with the monotheistic faith of the biblical God, few understand His unipersonality. This sermon endeavors to draw out key texts from both the old and new testaments to highlight the truth that has eluded many: that God is in fact a single person. The bible teaches, not Trinitarian monotheism, but rather Unitarian monotheism. (This sermon was originally preached at the Red Words Church on 2-May-2010 in Melbourne, Australia.)

Glory to God  [61:10]
by Z.B. Duncan rated at 2.3 (8 votes so far)

It turns out the local religious groups heard Pastor Duncan was coming to town and decided to run alternative programming during the revival meetings countering his messages. But even that wouldn't discourage Z.B. from contending for the truth and defending God's word. Today he shares more truths about this great God we worship.

Jesus had a Beginning  [25:25]
by Dustin Smith & Sean Finnegan rated at 2.3 (9 votes so far)

John 3.16 is probably the most famous verse in the Bible. From John 3.16 and many other places, we learn that Jesus is the 'only begotten son of God.' This important but overlooked word gives wonderful insight to the identity and origin of Jesus. Can someone who has a beginning have no beginning at the same time? (This video can also be viewed on Google Video http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=8001812102575252724

By Him all Things were Created  [24:33]
by Dustin Smith & Sean Finnegan rated at 2.3 (9 votes so far)

The Hebrew Scriptures testify consistently that Yahweh created the heavens and the earth, by Himself. What does it mean for Paul to write late that Jesus was involved with some sort of creative process? Does this mean Jesus is in fact God? Does this mean that Jesus literally pre-existed? A survey and exegesis of Colossians 1.16. (This video is also available on Google Video http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=-5078832950735204329).

Being Human  [15:55]
by Robin Todd rated at 2.3 (9 votes so far)

Who is Jesus? Why does who he is matter? Is knowing the truth important to understanding the gospel message of the kingdom? Is being human good enough? Do you have what it takes? Robin thoroughly answers these questions in today's study.

Debate: Is God One Person or Three?  [139:49]
by Anthony Buzzard vs. Fred Sanders rated at 2.3 (10 votes so far)

A full length moderated debate between a biblical unitarian and trinitarian scholars. Anthony Buzzard of Atlanta Bible College argues for God's oneness and Dr. Fred Sanders of Biola University takes the classical trinitarian viewpoint.

Origins of the 'Jesus Only' Movement (also called Oneness)  [59:34]
by Alex Hall rated at 2.2 (8 votes so far)

What is the 'Jesus Only' movement? Listen to a masterful historical sketch of how this ancient understanding of God arose.

The Radical Deformation: What Happened in the Second Century  [64:04]
by Alex Hall rated at 2.2 (8 votes so far)

Alex Hall documents via his research into Adolf Harnack's the History of Dogma, Volume I, how the second century church shifted from believing that Jesus was a miraculously begotten human being to thinking that he was a pre-existent being who became human.

Exposing the Christian Conspiracy  [60 pages]
by Clarissa Neumer rated at 2.2 (9 votes so far)

If you are comfortable with Christian doctrine as it has been presented to you, then read no further. If you are mildly curious about the origins of Christian beliefs as they are traditionally held, you might continue reading. If you are confused by the illogic of commonly held dogma in main line Christianity, then this work was written to remove a large portion of that perplexity. I intend to address a major piece of the incongruity and contradiction promulgated throughout the centuries in one of the primary doctrines of Christianity, which is contrary to the scriptures of the Word of God.

The Father is Greater than the Son  [63:05]
by Dustin Smith & Sean Finnegan rated at 2.2 (9 votes so far)

According to Jesus, the Father is greater than the Son. If this is true then they are not co-equal and the trinity is false! Listen to this if you are interested to understand one of the key unitarian verses in the NT, John 14:28.

That's My Boy  [19:57]
by Steve Taylor rated at 2.1 (8 votes so far)

God has a lot to be proud of in his boy. How does God's son affect your life? (Isaiah 42:1-4)

Jesus has a God  [16:02]
by Dustin Smith & Sean Finnegan rated at 2.0 (8 votes so far)

From the mouth of Jesus we learn he has a God. Could Jesus have one he calls 'my God' and yet he himself also be God? An overview of the 'my God' statements of Jesus with the purpose of learning more about who he really is. (This is also on Google Video by going to http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=6958015755630711287).

Debate: Open Discussion on the Trinity  [170:46]
by Faircloth and Gaston vs. Fox and Halls rated at 2.0 (8 votes so far)

The Biblical Unitarian Society at the University of Southampton, UK, has hosted a debate on the Trinity. The debate occurred on June 16th, 2008. Representing the trinitarian side were two Anglicans, Prof. Keith Fox and Chris Halls both from Highfield Church. The two biblical unitarians that participated in the debate were Ray Faircloth of Restoration Fellowship and Thomas Gaston, a Christadelphian. The debate lasted nearly three hours and is available now online in both audio and video formats.

Program Timetable
Introduction by Michael Ng [5 min]

Opening Statement by trinitarian Chris Halls [20 min]
Opening Statement by unitarian Thomas Gaston [20 min]
Opening Statement by trinitarian Prof. Keith Fox [20 min]
Opening Statement by unitarian Ray Faircloth [20 min]

Rebuttal by trinitarian Chris Halls [5 min]
Rebuttal by unitarian Thomas Gaston [5 min]
Rebuttal by trinitarian Prof. Keith Fox [5 min]
Rebuttal by unitarian Ray Faircloth [5 min]

Q&A [approx 45 min]

A Biblical View of God the Father  [7 mp3s]
by Joel Hemphill rated at 2.0 (8 votes so far)

This is the CD version of the famed gospel singer Joel Hemphill's revolutionary book To God Be the Glory. Joel begins this teaching series with a detailed account of how God brought him from a oneness theology (Jesus Only) through incredible challenges to an understanding that the Father alone is God. Click the audio icon to see the titles of each of these mp3s.

What is the Word in John 1.1?  [46:27]
by Vince Finnegan rated at 2.0 (8 votes so far)

The first verse of the Gospel of John is almost always used as a starting point to prove the Trinity. However, is there another way to read John 1.1: a way that makes sense of the overall context of Jewish Monotheism? Is "the word" the pre-incarnate Son of God or is there a more Hebrew way to approach the prologue of John?

The Nature of Preexistence in the New Testament  [12 pages]
by Anthony Buzzard rated at 2.0 (7 votes so far)

The so-called "preexistence" of Jesus in John refers to his "existence" in the Plan of God. The church has been plagued by the introduction of non-biblical language. There is a perfectly good word for "real" preexistence in the Greek language (pro-uparchon). It is very significant that it appears nowhere in Scripture, but it does in the writings of Greek church fathers of the second century. These Greek commentators on Scripture failed to understand the Hebrew categories of thought in which the New Testament is written.

Numbers Don't Lie  [22:52]
by Bruce Reye rated at 2.0 (7 votes so far)

The world around us is constantly changing. In an ever changing world the one thing that remains constant is mathematics because numbers don't lie. So much of mainstream Christianity has their numbers all wrong. If you were to believe them then you would also have to believe that either God has His math wrong or He really doesn't know who He is. Pastor Bruce Reye is here to tell us that "Numbers Don't Lie" and that the Bible does have its math correct.

ISAIAH 9:6 - "The Mighty God"  [26:23]
by Chuck Jones rated at 2.0 (7 votes so far)

In this continuing series from Isaiah 9:6, Pastor Chuck examines the meanings of the titles in this prophecy and the biblical application for us. Today's study is on the "The Mighty God," and asks the question, are you a "mighty champion" for God? Scriptures: Isaiah 9:1-6; 1 Samuel 17:4; Hebrews 2:10; 1 John 5:5; Proverbs 3:27; Psalms 36:6; Psalms 89:6; Psalms 29:1; Daniel 11:3

The Creation of Jesus in Colossians 1.16  [1 page]
by Jay Dicken rated at 2.0 (7 votes so far)

Jesus existed within the plan of God “before” the creation, and the plan of creation existed “in” him, and came into being “through” him, though he did not personally “create” the universe. As a reward for his faithfulness, God planned on giving him full control over creation, so in this way it was created “for” him. -- 1 Corinthians 3:11; 1 Peter 1:19, 20

Commentary on Jeremiah 23.6  [1 page]
by John Schoenheit, Mark Graeser, and John Lynn rated at 2.0 (7 votes so far)

When something is "called" a certain name, that does not mean that it is literally what it is called. Jerusalem is also called "the Lord our Righteousness," and Jerusalem is obviously not God (Jer. 33:16).Used with permission from biblicalunitarian.com

Trinity Debate  [73 pages]
by Jonathan Burke vs. Nick Norelli rated at 2.0 (7 votes so far)

Christadelphian missionary Jonathan Burke takes on evangelical blogger Nick Norelli in a four part debate between biblical unitarianism and traditional trinitarianism.

A Journey to Monotheism (Truth Matters)  [28:06]
by Nathan Crowder rated at 2.0 (7 votes so far)

Nathan Crowder of Schenectady, NY, has bachelor degrees from the University of Florida in Political Science and Zion Bible Institute in Theology and Pastoral Ministry. Throughout his Christian life he has diligently searched to discover biblical truth. This quest began when he discovered that the Bible taught that the destination of the redeemed was the kingdom of God on earth in fulfillment of the promises made by God to Abraham and David. He was surprised to learn while at Bible College that they did not teach this simple truth but instead ascribed to the mythological view that at death righteous souls escape the body to go to heaven. This first discovery prompted more investigation and more skepticism in regard to other teachings commonly accepted in mainstream Christianity.

As time went on, Nathan came to see that the phrase "Son of God" in the Bible did not in any way imply deity, but rather this was a title for the Messiah. He learned that the Hebrew concept of Messiah was that a human being would be divinely empowered by God to rule the world on his behalf. As time went on he increasingly came to question the traditional doctrine of the Trinity and found himself reading books by biblical unitarians like Anthony Buzzard, which made more sense of the biblical data. Listen in to this show to hear Nathan's journey of faith.

Also, if you would like to listen to or read his paper entitled Christ the Firstborn Head of the Universe, stop by www.christianmonotheism.com where it can be downloaded for free.

Is Jesus the Archangel Michael?   [10 pages]
by Ray Faircloth rated at 2.0 (7 votes so far)

Because Michael is “one of the foremost princes” (Dan. 10:13) we can see through the false assumptions that Michael is the only archangel and that he is a completely different creature to other angels.

God is Immortal, Jesus Died  [3 pages]
by Sean Finnegan rated at 2.0 (7 votes so far)

By definition, immortality is the state of being not able to die. If God is immortal then He can't die. Yet Jesus had to die for the sins of the world. So if Jesus is God then he could not have really paid for the sins of the world, because he could not have really died.

Incarnation of the Word  [83:04]
by Sean Finnegan rated at 2.0 (7 votes so far)

What does John 1.14 mean? Who or What is the Word and what does it mean for the Word to become flesh?

Commentary on 1 John 5.7-8  [2 pages]
by Sean Finnegan rated at 2.0 (7 votes so far)

Which is the original Greek text for 1 John 5:7-8?

1 John 5:7-8 [KJV] 7 For there are three that bear record in heaven, the Father, the Word, and the Holy Ghost: and these three are one. 8 And there are three that bear witness in earth, the Spirit, and the water, and the blood: and these three agree in one.

OR

1 John 5:7-8 [NASB] 7 For there are three that testify: 8 the Spirit and the water and the blood; and the three are in agreement.

This article explains when and why the mysterious addition (known as the comma Johanneum) came to be in the most influential version in English history--the KJV.

Should We Worship Jesus?  [59:27]
by Sean Finnegan rated at 2.0 (7 votes so far)

Sean Finnegan begins by affirming, along with 1 Timothy 2.5, that the Father is the only God before delving into the question of worshiping Jesus. He covers the basic vocabulary of worship, various acts of worship, standard objections to worshiping Jesus, and limitations on that worship. In the end he concludes that Jesus should be worshiped because God has ordained it to be so, but this is not idolatry because God receives glory when Jesus is worshiped.

The Holy Spirit and Translation Bias (2)  [56:05]
by Sean Finnegan rated at 2.0 (7 votes so far)

Sean Finnegan builds on part one and works through the five primary texts used to prove the personality of the holy spirit on grammatical grounds (John 14.26; 15.26; 16.13; Ephesians 1.14; 1 John 5.7). Next he explains how to understand the spirit based on the whole of the Biblical data and concludes it cannot and should not be locked in the straightjacket of trinitarian dogma. Notes available at http://www.christianmonotheism.com/media/text/Sean%20Finnegan%20--%20Translating%20the%20Holy%20Spirit%202.pdf

Who Is John Biddle?  [29:37]
by Sean Kelly rated at 2.0 (7 votes so far)

Sean Kelly shares about John Biddle, a courageous and indefatigable British unitarian who suffered greatly for the faith.

Monotheism  [53:31]
by Steve Katsaras rated at 2.0 (7 votes so far)

The bible teaches monotheism - that God alone is the only one who is truly God. This sermon endeavors to highlight key texts from both the old and new testaments where the Greek word "monos" is used in reference to God's personality and nature to clearly identify Him as a single, one and only God. (This sermon was originally preached at the Red Words Church on 11-Oct-2009 in Melbourne, Australia.)

The Doctrine of God and Christ  [52:40]
by Steve Katsaras rated at 2.0 (7 votes so far)

Citing more than 60 verses, Steve Katsaras of Australia thoroughly explains the biblical doctrines of God and Christ before telling the story of how these truths were corrupted in the ecumenical counsels of the fourth and fifth centuries.

Yahweh is one, not two or three, and there is no God besides him. The Bible uses singular pronouns in reference to God thousands upon thousands of time, a fact that clearly teaches God is a singular individual. This one God is the eternal, omniscient, omnipotent, and omnipresent creator of heaven and earth.

Jesus is the human mediator who called God his Father. Jesus had a beginning in time and is the miraculously born son of God. Jesus recognized his Father as the only true God who was his superior. Jesus admitted to possessing limited knowledge; he was a mortal man who experienced temptation, hunger, thirst, weariness, suffering, death, and resurrection.

The doctrines of God and Christ mutated over time and continued to develop in new and unbiblical ways after the New Testament was written. Steve talks about the first four ecumenical counsels (Nicea in a.d. 325, Constantinople in a.d. 381, Ephesus in a.d. 431, and Chalcedon in a.d. 451) to demonstrate how these doctrines evolved over time.

Search for the Origins of the Trinity  [51:52]
by Steve Katsaras rated at 2.0 (7 votes so far)

Steve Katsaras explains the history and development of the Trinity.

Who is God? Who is Jesus?  [59:48]
by Dustin Smith & J.J. Fletcher rated at 1.9 (10 votes so far)

Two Atlanta Bible College students work out the classic biblical unitarian position on who God is and who Jesus is. Join them as they honestly bring forth the biblical definitions of God and Jesus free from traditional dogma.

Debate: A Biblical Unitarian Debate  [55 pages]
by Danny Dixon vs. Marc Taylor rated at 1.9 (9 votes so far)

What follows is a private written debate conducted at the Christian Apologetics Research Ministry website (CARM.org) June 22, 2006 to October 10, 2006 between Trinitarian Marc Taylor and Christian Strict Monotheist Danny Andre' Dixon. The points addressed are limited, but were thorough in the points that were covered. The formal debate allowed approximately 2500 word per constructive or rebuttal presentation, although the disputants did not always use all of their space. The schedule for arguments proceeded as follows:

Unitarian Introduction
Trinitarian Introduction

Unitarian 1st Constructive
Trinitarian 1st Constructive
Unitarian 2nd Constructive
Trinitarian 2nd Constructive
Unitarian 3rd Constructive
Trinitarian 3rd Constructive

Unitarian 1st Rebuttal
Trinitarian 1st Rebuttal
Unitarian 2nd Rebuttal
Trinitarian 2nd Rebuttal

Unitarian Conclusion
Trinitarian Conclusion


The debaters can be reached for comment as follows: Marc Taylor (oceanstar314@yahoo.com), Danny Andre' Dixon (dixonda@gmail.com)

Christian Persecution in Australia  [58:07]
by Carlos Jimenez rated at 1.9 (8 votes so far)

From agnostic to Christian heretic, one person's journey to faith in the "one and only true God" (John 17.3) and subsequent rejection and persecution through the Australian theological system.

Are the Father, Son and Holy Spirit all one God?  [263:43]
by Patrick Navas vs. Brian Garcia rated at 1.9 (8 votes so far)

Patrick Navas, author of Divine Truth or Human Tradition defends the notion that the Father of Jesus is the only true God. Brian Garcia, former Jehovah's Witness apologist and now Christian apologist, defends the classic doctrine of the Trinity. The show is hosted by Rick Fearon, moderator of the forum In Search of Truth from the website SixScreensOfTheWatchtower.com (a ministry focused on Jehovah's Witnesses and ex-JWs). Although the conversation degrades with time as others call in, the beginning portions of the show are well worth their time to hear both sides of the discussion.

A Very Short Explanation of John 1.1, 14  [<1 page]
by Sean Finnegan rated at 1.9 (8 votes so far)

What is the "word" in John 1:1? Is it the creative utterance of God found in Genesis 1:1 or the pre-existing Son of God?

Explaining Matthew 28.19  [56:27]
by Steve Katsaras rated at 1.9 (8 votes so far)

This text has widely come to be known as the Trinitarian baptismal formula - baptism into the threefold name. This is perhaps the strongest text found in the Bible that supposedly proves that God is a plurality of persons, spoken directly by Jesus himself! Is this assertion true? Is Jesus advocating 3 divine persons within the one essence of God by introducing this formula? The following is a study of the text using a range of methods to highlight the weight of evidence for/against each argument.

Talking with Jesus  [56:19]
by John Cortright rated at 1.9 (7 votes so far)

Should we pray to Jesus? John Cortright establishes that Jesus, though not physically present, can hear us and communicate as well through the spirit. We can offer thanksgiving to Jesus though prayer is to be directed to God the Father in the name of Jesus Christ.

The `logos` in John`s Prologue  [16 pages]
by Ray Faircloth rated at 1.9 (7 votes so far)

In his prologue John is demonstrating how God, through Jesus, completes his creation as the New Creation. However, perhaps the most helpful points are the understanding that the term word is inadequate to express the meaning of logos.

A Very Short Explanation of John 8.58  [<1 page]
by Sean Finnegan rated at 1.9 (7 votes so far)

Is Jesus the "I Am" of Exodus who met Moses at the burning bush? If he is then so is the blind man in John 9.9 since he used the same exact phrase as Jesus in John 8.58.

A Very Short Explanation of Titus 2.13  [<1 page]
by Sean Finnegan rated at 1.9 (7 votes so far)

Is Jesus "God our savior" is there a translation issue at stake in Titus 2:13?

Colossians 1.15-20: Preexistence or Preeminence  [6 pages]
by William Wachtel rated at 1.9 (7 votes so far)

In standard evangelical commentary, two texts from Paul's writings are constantly used to teach the personal preexistence of Christ: Philippians 2:5-11 and Colossians 1:15-20. William Wachtel questions seriously, however, whether any such ideas were in Paul's mind. In Philippians 2:5, for instance, Paul declares he is holding forth the historical example of the man Christ Jesus, not some prehistoric example into which can be read ideas of personal preexistence. Can the same be said to be true of Colossians 1:15-20?

Adonai and Adoni (Psalm 110:1)  [2 pages]
by Anthony Buzzard rated at 1.8 (7 votes so far)

The Messiah is called adoni (my lord) and in every one of its 195 occurrences adoni (my lord) means a superior who is not God. Adonai on the other hand refers exclusively to the One God in all of its 449 occurrences. Adonai is the title of Deity and adoni never designates Deity.

Commentary on Genesis 1.26 and 11.7  [2 pages]
by John Schoenheit, Mark Graeser, and John Lynn rated at 1.6 (7 votes so far)

This use of the plural is for amplification, and is called a "plural of majesty" or a "plural of emphasis," and is used for intensification (see note on Gen. 1:1). Many Hebrew scholars identify this use of "us" as the use of the plural of majesty or plural of emphasis, and we believe this also. Used with permission from biblicalunitarian.com

The Real Jesus  [1 page]
by Kermit Zarley rated at 1.6 (7 votes so far)

A printable tract (two per sheet) which details who Jesus of Nazareth really was--the human Messiah of God not God in human flesh. This tract was written by the mysterious "Servetus the Evangelical" whose identity will remain anonymous until 2011. For more information about him and his book visit servetustheevangelical.com.

Debate: Is Yeshua the One God of Israel  [358:35]
by Matthew Janzen vs. Michael Bugg rated at 1.6 (7 votes so far)

On May 24th and 25th of 2008, Michael Bugg and Matthew Janzen debated the question Is Yeshua the One God of Israel?. The debate occurred over two nights. The first night was at Michael Bugg's church (he is a messianic Jew who holds to a modified version of the Trinity). The second night of the debate was held at Matthew Janzen's church (he is the biblical unitarian).
An interesting feature of the debate was that it occurred in twenty minute speeches all throughout. Rather than having an opening statement followed by a couple of rebuttals, every speech was twenty minutes (at least until the question and answer time).

Basic Background of the Trinity  [6 pages]
by Ray Faircloth rated at 1.6 (7 votes so far)

With remarkable brevity and thoroughness Ray Faircloth outlines the major theological positions of early Christianity regarding God and Christ and capably delineates the corresponding modern positions of as well.

Elohim: What Does the Word God Mean?  [3 pages]
by Sean Finnegan rated at 1.6 (7 votes so far)

It may be shocking to learn that the word 'God' was much more flexible at the time of the writing of the Bible than it is today. In fact, Moses, Satan, and the Judges of Israel were all given the divine title, yet no one felt the need to construct philosophically nuanced redefinitions of who God is.

A Very Short Explanation of Isaiah 9.6  [<1 page]
by Sean Finnegan rated at 1.6 (7 votes so far)

Here Jesus is called "Mighty God" not because he shares in the nature or being of God, but because he represents God.

Sit Thou At My Right Hand (Psalm 110.1)  [5 pages]
by Allon Maxwell rated at 1.6 (6 votes so far)

This Old Testament verse, from Psalm 110:1, is quoted in the New Testament no less than 22 times! The Messianic significance attached to it by the New Testament writers demands our attention.

God and Jesus  [88:35]
by Anthony Buzzard rated at 1.6 (6 votes so far)

Anthony discusses the popular argument that Elohim has a plural ending and thus points to plurality in God. Elohim when used for the One God is not plural in meaning. The four "let us" texts should never be allowed to contradict the thousands and thousands of singular pronouns by which God describes Himself (not Themselves!) in the Bible. The brilliant and unifying text in Deut. 6:4, 5 which Jesus celebrated as the greatest truth of all (Mark 12:28ff.) informs us that God is a single Person. the Trinitarian understanding of God as Three Persons is a much later development that the Bible does not recognize. Jesus and Paul did not believe in a Triune God.

According to Jesus, God is Strictly One Person, not Three.  [1 page]
by Anthony Buzzard rated at 1.6 (6 votes so far)

According to Jesus, God is strictly one Person, not three. Christians who value Jesus as the supreme revealer of truth should consider his classic words, uttered in a final prayer. "You, Father, are the only one who is truly God" (John 17:3). He defined salvation as belief in that One and only true God, and in himself as the Messiah (John 17:3). It is a serious hijacking of the words of Jesus if one adds to Jesus' creed. For Jesus, his Father is "the one who alone is truly God, the only one who is truly God, the one true God" (see also John 5:44 and Mark 12:29).

Testing for Truth -- A Critical Question about Your Creed  [8 pages]
by Anthony Buzzard rated at 1.6 (6 votes so far)

John’s Truth-test (I John 4:2, II John 7) is critically relevant to our times. Belief in Jesus as the Christ, a real human descendant of David is still the Biblical criterion for proof that one is drawing inspiration from the spirit of Truth. It remains as true as ever that the fundamental doctrinal test of the professing Christian has to do with his view of the person of Christ. The denial of the humanity of Jesus is the fatal flaw detected by the Johannine test. God’s Son is the Son of Mary and of David. Of sonship prior to His conception in history the Bible has nothing to say. Such a notion is destructive of Jesus’ genuine humanity and genuine descent from David. Jesus, the Jewish-Christian Messiah, needs urgently to be reinstated at the heart of Christian devotion. Belief in Him and in His Father, the only true God, leads to salvation (John 17:3).

John 1.1 Caveat Lector (Reader Beware)  [13 pages]
by Anthony Buzzard rated at 1.6 (6 votes so far)

In all probability John has been "turned on his head." What he intended was to stave off all attempts to introduce a duality into the Godhead. For John the word was the one God Himself, not a second person. The later, post-biblical shift from "word" as divine promise from the beginning, the Gospel lodged in the mind and purpose of the one God, to an actual second divine "person," the Son, alive before his birth, introduced a principle of confusion and chaos from which the church has never freed itself. This shift was the corrupting seed of later Trinitarianism. God became two and later, with the addition of the holy spirit, three. It remains for believers today to return to belief in Jesus as the human Messiah and in the One God of Israel, his Father, as the "one who alone is truly God" (John 17:3). God is one person not three.

Gabriel Was Not a Trinitarian  [7 pages]
by Anthony Buzzard rated at 1.6 (6 votes so far)

I suggest that this Christological statement from the angel Gabriel be taken as the basis for identifying who Jesus is. It should be understood as a clarion call for unity, a rallying point for divided Christendom. What better way of calling Christians back to their first-century roots? The message is simple and clear. The Son of God of Gabriel's announcement is none other than a divinely created Son of God, coming into existence--begotten--as Son in his mother's womb.

A Christological Confession  [7 pages]
by Anthony Buzzard rated at 1.6 (6 votes so far)

At a time when theological literature emphasizes a plurality of Christologies within the New Testament canon, we should not forget that, despite differences of emphasis, there is a common confession throughout all the New Testament documents which embeds itself in the statement that Jesus is the Messiah.

Elohim and Other Key Terms  [36]
by Anthony Buzzard rated at 1.6 (6 votes so far)

If Elohim is plural and thus means Gods then what is the significance of the singular verb following? ("he [not they] created"). We would have to translate, "In the beginning Gods, he created" or "Gods was the creator." We are rapidly reducing the sacred text to nonsense. The solution is to realize that Elohim, though plural in form, is singular in meaning.

Recovering True Monotheism  [79:03]
by Daniel Calcagno rated at 1.6 (6 votes so far)

Is God really three persons made up of one essence? Is Jesus the Son of God or God the Son? Join us as we discover that God is one person and that Jesus is the begotten son of God. Email Daniel at contact@messianicniagara.com or visit his website at messianicniagara.com

Jesus Christ and the Trinity -- What Does the Bible Say?  [26 pages]
by Duncan Heaster vs. Leslie Everitt rated at 1.6 (6 votes so far)

Evangelical Christian, Leslie Everitt debates Christadelphian Duncan Heaster on whether or not the Trinity is biblical. This is the transcription of a live debate which occurred November 12, 1988 in Kent, UK at the Bromley Christian Center.

One God, One Message  [65:54]
by J. Dan Gill rated at 1.6 (6 votes so far)

If there is really only ONE God, then there is really only ONE message. Listen to this sermon to hear the ingredients of our ONE message of faith.

Is the Trinity Necessary for Salvation (Truth Matters)  [28:06]
by J. Dan Gill rated at 1.6 (6 votes so far)

During over three decades of ministry, Tennessee pastor J. Dan Gill has observed a tendency within evangelicalism to preach the gospel without telling people about the doctrine of the Trinity. In fact, large crusades that Billy Graham preaches at do not inform people about these matters at all. Is this modern tendency good news or bad news? Some, in their zeal to uphold their church's traditions have declared that those who do not believe in the doctrine of the Trinity or the dual natures of Christ are not Christians. Who is right?

In his authentic and endearing southern style, pastor Gill brings us to the Scriptures, especially the book of Acts, in order to decipher an answer based on the evangelism of the first Christians. In the end, Dan assures us that we are not stuck between loosing our mind or loosing our soul as the famous quip has it: "If you try to understand the Trinity, you lose your mind; if you don't believe in it, you lose your soul"

Does 1 John 5.20 Call Jesus God?  [1 page]
by Jay Dicken rated at 1.6 (6 votes so far)

Through this substitution we can see that the correct antecedent of the phrase “This is the true God and eternal life” is the Father. At John 17:1, 3 Jesus prayed, “Father,... this is eternal LIFE, that they know You the only true God, and Jesus Christ whom you have sent.”

Is the Spirit a Person in John 14.16?  [< 1 page]
by Jay Dicken rated at 1.6 (6 votes so far)

In John 14:16, 18 notice what Jesus said, “And I will pray the Father, and He will give you another [allos] helper, to be with you forever / I will not leave you desolate; I will come to you.” At Matthew 28:20 Jesus said, “Lo, I am with you always, to the close of the ages.” It is through the coming of this promised helper, the holy spirit, that Jesus comes to them and remains with them (although he is physically absent), hence the use of allos. As said before, the holy spirit is reflective of Personality, in this case, that of Jesus Christ.

Logos: What is the "Word"?  [31:24]
by Jim Rankin rated at 1.6 (6 votes so far)

Often in our Bible study it's important to fully study out the meaning and interpretation of a passage to better understand the writer's intention. And, of course, English Bibles are a translation, not the original text. When we examine the original languages, we might be surprised to learn how one little "word" could be translated so many ways.

Commentary on 1 Timothy 3.16  [2 pages]
by John Schoenheit, Mark Graeser, and John Lynn rated at 1.6 (6 votes so far)

Although the above verse in the NIV does not support the Trinity, there are some Greek manuscripts that read, "God appeared in the flesh." This reading of some Greek manuscripts has passed into some English versions, and the King James Version is one of them. Trinitarian scholars admit, however, that these Greek texts were altered by scribes in favor of the Trinitarian position. The reading of the earliest and best manuscripts is not "God" but rather "he who." Almost all the modern versions have the verse as "the mystery of godliness is great, which was manifest in the flesh," or some close equivalent.

Commentary on Colossians 1.15-20  [3 pages]
by John Schoenheit, Mark Graeser, and John Lynn rated at 1.6 (6 votes so far)

As with all good biblical exegesis, it is important to note the context of the verses and why they would be written and placed where they are. Reading the Book of Colossians reveals that the Colossian Church had lost its focus on Christ. Some of the believers at Colosse had, in practice, forsaken their connection with the Head, Jesus Christ, and some were even being led to worship angels (2:18 and 19). The situation in Colosse called for a strong reminder of Christ’s headship over his Church, and the epistle to the Colossians provided just that.

Commentary on Matthew 1.23  [1 page]
by John Schoenheit, Mark Graeser, John Lynn rated at 1.6 (6 votes so far)

The name can be translated as, “God with us” or “God is with us.” We know that God was with the people in Jesus Christ, and Jesus himself said that if one had seen him, he had seen the Father.

Shared Titles of God and Christ  [4 pages]
by Mike Hicks rated at 1.6 (6 votes so far)

Mike Hicks, a former Oneness believer tackles their strongest arguments for Jesus' deity--shared titles. Read this brief yet helpful article to discover the truth about shared titles including, Redeemer, Savior, God, Shepherd, Lord, King of Kings, and Judge.

Two Witnesses: Oneness Sleight of Hand  [3 pages]
by Mike Hicks rated at 1.6 (6 votes so far)

Jesus' statement, "I am He who testifies about Myself, and the Father who sent Me testifies about Me", clearly indicates that Jesus and his Father are two distinct witnesses. Join Mike Hicks as he draws out the implications of this for oneness theology.

Only One God  [33:16]
by Paul Rankin rated at 1.6 (6 votes so far)

Orthodoxy tells us that we have to believe a "trinity" to be Christians. But why isn't this triune teaching obvious anywhere in scripture? Who or what did Jesus and his fellow Jews worship? In today's message, you may be surprised to find the simple the truth when we let scripture speak for itself.

The Holy Spirit is Not a Person Distinct From The Father  [10 pages]
by Ray Faircloth rated at 1.6 (6 votes so far)

Evidently the holy spirit is not a 3rd person within the formula of a trinity; but rather is God’s own spirit—His mind powerfully expressed into action as outreach to his creation. Since his exaltation to the right hand of God Jesus also expresses his spirit—his mind into action as outreach to his disciples. Because holy spirit means God’s thoughts (and therefore also Jesus’ thoughts)—His mind projected to the receptive human mind, we can say that we have God’s spirit when we are considering the holy Scriptures i.e. when reading/studying them, discussing them or in living our lives in a way that is in harmony with them, including prayer. In this way we are empowered to do God’s will in its many aspects. Also the spirit of God has such power that it brought the universe into being, and will be the power (in Christ’s hands) that brings “the new heavens and earth” into being in the future.

Responding To Trinitarian Claims About Jesus  [18 pages]
by Ray Faircloth rated at 1.6 (6 votes so far)

The doctrine of the Trinity states that God is 3 persons in one nature; but the theory of the hypostatic union states that Jesus was one person with 2 natures – one divine and the other human. This is a contradictory position. If the 3 persons of the Godhead are one nature and Jesus’ 2nd nature, when he was on earth, is combined with it then God has 2 natures. And yet they are supposed to be one nature if Jesus was actually God. This would also mean that the entire Godhead was present on earth when Jesus was on earth.

The Problem of Trinitarian Translation  [8 pages]
by Ray Faircloth rated at 1.6 (6 votes so far)

Does the Bible ever call Jesus God? It turns out that the smattering of texts which trinitarian apologists customarily offer as proof for Jesus' divinity have major manuscript and translation issues. Ray Faircloth takes on a journey to discover what the various alternatives are for understanding classic scriptures such as Isaiah 9.6, 1 John 5.7; John 1.18; Titus 2.13; 2 Peter 1.1, etc.

When Did the Son of God Come into Existence?  [10 pages]
by Ray Faircloth rated at 1.6 (6 votes so far)

The vast majority of the Scriptures provide no support at all for a doctrine of literal “pre- existence.” For instance, from the entire Hebrew Scriptures only Genesis 1:26; Proverbs 8:22, 30 and Micah 5:2 have been advanced in any attempt at such proof. Yet in the Christian Greek Scriptures there is no hint of pre-existence in Matthew, Mark, Luke, Acts, Romans, 2 Corinthians, Galatians, Ephesians, 1 and 2 Thessalonians, 1 and 2 Timothy, Titus, Philemon, James, 1 and 2 Peter, 1, 2 and 3 John or Jude.

Jesus Confirmed the Shema  [3 pages]
by Sean Finnegan rated at 1.6 (6 votes so far)

[Fact 1] All Jews believe that God is one [Fact 2] Jesus is a Jew [Fact 3] Jesus explicitly confirmed that God is one [Conclusion] Followers of Jesus should believe God is one not three.

Is Jesus Both God and Man?  [3 pages]
by Sean Finnegan rated at 1.6 (6 votes so far)

The dual nature of Jesus trick is used to get Trintarians out of trouble every time the Scripture conflicts with their theory. Yet, is it possible to be both God and Man at the same time? Is there such a thing as impersonal humanity? What does the Bible say?

Scholars Speak on Titus 2.13  [1 page]
by Sean Finnegan rated at 1.6 (6 votes so far)

Frances Young and Jason David BeDuhn explain how Titus 2:13 should be translated. In particular BeDuhn debunks "Sharp's Rule" showing that this "rule" is no more than bias read into the grammar.

Worship the True God (Jeremiah 10.1-16)  [49:21]
by Sean Finnegan rated at 1.6 (6 votes so far)

Yahweh is the living, powerful, wise, genius creator at whose wrath the nations tremble. He is the one who controls the waters, clouds, lightning, rain, wind. He is great, powerful, and to be feared. He is the inheritance of God’s people. Worship God, he is worthy. Truth matters! Our current cultural climate devalues truth saying that being nice is all that matters...I’m sure there were many nice idol worshipers, but God was still offended at such behavior as we can see over and over in the Scriptures. Truth matters. Love matters. Let’s do both, and not just fall into the mold set for us by our culture.

1 John 5.7  [35:56]
by Steve Katsaras rated at 1.6 (6 votes so far)

Steve Katsaras explains 1 John 5.7.

Elohim  [53:21]
by Steve Katsaras rated at 1.6 (6 votes so far)

This teaching endeavors to uncover the usage of the Hebrew word Elohim, translated in English, God. Elohim, its meaning and its interpretation has been greatly debated in Christendom, giving way to the idea that the word suggests that God is a plurality of persons. Nothing could be further from the truth. The biblical data that begins to unfold during this sermon shows how flexibly the word is used - for the One true God, for angels, men, nations, etc... Click here for part two, entitled "Theos." (This sermon was originally preached at the Red Words Church on 30-May-2010 in Melbourne, Australia.)

Echad  [48:45]
by Steve Katsaras rated at 1.6 (6 votes so far)

This teaching endeavors to uncover the usage of the Hebrew word Echad, translated in English, one. Echad has been greatly misunderstood, when the subject of how many God is - the most prevalent teaching that says the word Echad means a plurality in unity (a oneness). Echad has meant and will always mean numerically one - and this teaching goes to length to reveal the biblical data that fairly represents this truth. God is truly echad, a uni-personal being.

Eis  [48:56]
by Steve Katsaras rated at 1.6 (6 votes so far)

This teaching is part 2 of where Echad left - uncovering the usage of the NT Greek word Eis, translated in English, one. The trend that is found in the OT Hebrew regarding Echad, which means numerically one, is carried into the NT - "eis" and its counterparts words like "en", "monos" and the like, clearly bring to light the wonderful truth that God is a single person, not triune as the popular tradition of the Trinity asserts. This teaching attempts to present the biblical data.

Picture Perfect: The Complete Picture of Christ  [20:18]
by Steve Taylor rated at 1.6 (6 votes so far)

Who is Jesus? What does he look like, and WHOM does he resemble?

Jesus The Messiah  [24:25]
by Terry M. Ferrell rated at 1.6 (6 votes so far)

Who is Jesus really? Who is this promised king? How important is it to understand who Jesus really is and the significance of being the foretold Messiah? How does understanding who Jesus is affect your life? Jesus tells us in his own words.

First-Century Christians: One God  [22:49]
by Terry M. Ferrell rated at 1.6 (6 votes so far)

There have been many centuries of Hellenistic constraints on Christianity, and many councils and creeds since the days of the early apostles. But exactly what did the early followers of Jesus believe? Though most "orthodox" Christians believe in a trinity, was that concept really taught and believed in the early church? What about the "Shema?" What about the simple unity of God? Is our basis of belief on the word of God, or has it been formulated throughout the history of the church? In today's message, we examine the one God of the Hebrew scriptures and what the early church professed about their God and his Son. Mark 12:28-34; Deuteronomy 6:4; 1 Corinthians 8:6; Ephesians 4:6; 1 Timothy 2:5; Isaiah 44:6; 2 Timothy 3:16

The Truth of John 1  [38:00]
by Tony Dart rated at 1.6 (6 votes so far)

The earth was framed by the word of God. Man was formed by the word of God. And what God has said, he has done. In his word is power. In his word is life.

Did Jesus Claim to be the "I Am" in John 8.58?  [36:25]
by Victor Gluckin rated at 1.6 (6 votes so far)

John 8 contains insight into the identity of Jesus. Did he really use the title 'I AM' to refer his hearers back to God's encounter with Moses at the burning bush (Exodus 3.14) or is this an instance where translation bias has twisted the Scripture? Why is it that the same Greek phrase is translated just nine verses later as "I am the one" when it is found on the lips of the blind man?

Idolatry and Compassion  [52:41]
by Vince Finnegan rated at 1.6 (6 votes so far)

Do not be unequally yoked with idolaters, it will cause disastrous consequences as can be demonstrated through looking at the influences of Jezebel and her descendants.

Monotheism Makes Sense (Truth Matters)  [34:20]
by George Littler rated at 1.5 (7 votes so far)

George Littler has been leading a home Bible fellowship for the past 30 years in Poughkeepsie, New York. As a child he attended the local Catholic church but never really connected with God so that by the age of 13 he quit going. Subsequent to this and throughout his troubled twenties he considered himself an anti-theist (someone who believed in God but was mad at him). Not until a Christian shared the faith with him in an apartment bathroom during a party did George finally come to the place of accepting Jesus as his Lord and Savior.

Listen in to this conversation to hear not only a riveting story of how God in his love pursued George throughout his early tumultuous years, but also how he was saved apart from believing in the Trinity or other complex doctrines which made little sense to a street-smart New Yorker. His engaging tone, sense of humor, and poignant ability to state the logical make for an insightful and memorable discussion.

John 8.58  [72:02]
by Steve Katsaras rated at 1.5 (7 votes so far)

Steve Katsaras explains John 8.58

An Explanation of Philippians 2:5-6  [77:01]
by Alex Hall rated at 1.4 (6 votes so far)

Was Jesus is the form of God? If so, what does that mean? Did Jesus empty himself of his divinity to become man? Join Alex Hall as he explains the most famous Christological hymn in the New Testament.

Does Everyone Believe in the Trinity  [11 pages]
by Anthony Buzzard rated at 1.4 (6 votes so far)

It is customary for students of the Bible to refer to Jesus as God and to insist that belief in a Trinity of three co-equal, co-eternal Persons in the One God is the hallmark of true faith. Many recognized Bible scholars do not think, however, that Jesus is called God, in a Trinitarian sense, in the Scriptures. Distinguished experts on the Bible, past and present, maintain that the doctrine of a Tri-personal God is nowhere taught in Scripture.

Is Jesus God or God's Christ?  [9:10]
by Anthony Buzzard & Jamie Engelbert rated at 1.4 (6 votes so far)

In the Bible to be the Son of God means that you are not God, but the awaited Jewish Messiah.

Is the Father of Jesus alone God Almighty?  [248 pages]
by Danny Dixon vs. Marc Taylor rated at 1.4 (6 votes so far)

An online written debate conducted between August 17, 2010 and October 2, 2010 between Danny André Dixon and Marc Taylor. This debate was hosted by the KingdomReady Blog and as such all comments made by original post readers are included as well. This is the second debate between these two Christians. To read their previous debate, click here.

Applying God's Truth  [23:19]
by David Krogh rated at 1.4 (6 votes so far)

What does it mean to believe in the Oneness of God? Have you replaced the worship of the one true God with other things?

The Truth: Does it Matter? Upon This Rock...  [29:57]
by John Railton rated at 1.4 (6 votes so far)

Continuing our series on the importance of truth, and taking a closer look at the "rock" the church is built upon, and the importance of knowing and believing the truth.

Commentary on Revelation 1.8  [2 pages]
by John Schoenheit, Mark Graeser, and John Lynn rated at 1.4 (6 votes so far)

What does it mean to be called the Alpha and Omega? Both God and Jesus are given this title.

Commentary on 1 Peter 1.11  [1 page]
by John Schoenheit, Mark Graeser, and John Lynn rated at 1.4 (6 votes so far)

The fact that this verse says the "spirit of Christ" was upon people in the Old Testament has caused people to believe that Christ himself was present in the Old Testament. But, as we will see, such is not the case.

Commentary on John 1.15  [1 page]
by John Schoenheit, Mark Graeser, John Lynn rated at 1.4 (6 votes so far)

This verse is occasionally used to support the Trinity because it is assumed that for Jesus to come “before” John he would have had to exist before John. While it is true that the Greek word “before” (protos) can mean “before in time,” it can just as easily be “first,” “chief,” “leader,” etc.

Jesus is Either God or a Madman or...  [71:41]
by Ken Westby rated at 1.4 (6 votes so far)

Taking up C.S. Lewis' challenge to identify Jesus as God, a madman, or a demon, Ken demonstrates that an option has been left out--that he is God's human Messiah.

Dual Deceits about God  [71:42]
by Ken Westby rated at 1.4 (6 votes so far)

An impassioned plea to know God as he is truly represented in Scripture, without the Trinitarian view, without the Greek immovable view, but as He truly is.

Questioning the Trinity on Message Boards  [62:56]
by Sean Finnegan rated at 1.4 (6 votes so far)

Sean has been excommunicated from three message boards for questioning the trinity. Hear about his experience and see what we are up against!

Jesus has a God  [3 pages]
by Sean Finnegan rated at 1.4 (6 votes so far)

Jesus says the words 'my God' several times in Scripture. Thus, Jesus has a God, one that He worships. If Jesus has a God, then can he be God? Does the Father ever call Jesus, 'my God?' Join Sean Finnegan as he surveys the texts in which Jesus says 'my God.'

Jesus Could have Sinned but Overcame  [3 pages]
by Sean Finnegan rated at 1.4 (6 votes so far)

God cannot sin nor is He tempted with evil. Jesus was tempted by Satan but through his reliance on God and the Scriptures he overcame.

Scholars Speak on 2 Peter 1.1  [1 page]
by Sean Finnegan rated at 1.4 (6 votes so far)

Patrick Navas explains 2 Peter 1:1 and Titus 2:13, describing the ways this verse can be translated.

Scholars Speak on Romans 9.5  [1 page]
by Sean Finnegan rated at 1.4 (6 votes so far)

J. Schneider describes how Romans 9.5 may be translated and the likelihood that Paul is not really calling Jesus God here.

A Very Short Explanation of Philippians 2.6  [<1 page]
by Sean Finnegan rated at 1.4 (6 votes so far)

Is Jesus in very nature God or is he in the form/image of God?

Does the Changeless Change?  [24:37]
by Steve Taylor rated at 1.4 (6 votes so far)

Can a changeless God change his mind? Have you ever thought about it? If God can, why does He? Listen this week as Pastor Steve teaches us about his discovery from a weekly devotional study, and what can, and cannot, change with our Heavenly Father.

Responding To Trinitarian Claims About God  [3 pages]
by Ray Faircloth rated at 1.3 (6 votes so far)

This frequently used Hebrew name for God (elohim) is a plural form. When it refers to the true God, the singular verb is normally used, as here. The plural form indicates majesty; the name stresses God’s sovereignty and incomparability – he is “the God of gods.”

Jesus: Son of Man, Son of God  [41:15]
by Victor Gluckin rated at 1.3 (6 votes so far)

The traditional doctrine of the hypostatic union (dual natures) maintains that the title 'Son of Man' refers to the human nature of Jesus while the title 'Son of God' refers to the divine nature of Jesus. Yet, is this biblical? What does the Bible teach about these two titles? Is 'Son of God' equivalent to 'God the Son?' Victor Gluckin mounts a convincing case that 'Son of God' should be understood messianically and 'Son of Man' should be interpreted in light of Daniel 7.13-14.

The Son of God  [38:56]
by William Wachtel rated at 1.3 (6 votes so far)

Who did Jesus say he was? Who do the writers of the Bible say he is? Ask yourself: What is this Jesus to you? Scriptures include: Psalm 2:7-12; Hebrews 1:1-5

The Holy Spirit in the Old Testament  [53:34]
by Jesse Acuff rated at 1.3 (7 votes so far)

Repeatedly, the very church that insists that the Holy Spirit is a distinct "person," and the third member of the Holy Trinity, contradicts itself when it states the unadulterated truth. If the Spirit of God was not a person in the Old Testament, it is not a person in the New Testament, and therefore not a member of a so-called Holy Trinity! God does not change to suit the whims and fanciful imaginations of men be they pagan or Christian. There is neither variableness nor shadow of turning with the great Creator God of this universe. However, if there were, and if God, at some point decided that He should become a Trinity on a lark in order to satiate pagan man's inordinate desire to worship Him as such, where is the proof? Such a God would not be deserving of worship. Where indeed can we find in the pages of the Bible during the period between the close of the prophetic age of the Old Testament and the opening of the Messianic age of the New, a clear and precise message calling for a change in the number of the members of the Godhead? We cannot, for there is none.

Jesus Son of God from Matthew and Luke  [77:44]
by Anthony Buzzard rated at 1.1 (6 votes so far)

A study of the origin of Jesus from Matthew and Luke reveals that Jesus is originated as a human being in the womb of his mother via the miracle of the holy spirit.

Who Should Christians Worship?   [52:05]
by Dale Tuggy rated at 1.1 (6 votes so far)

This is a two-part presentation by Dr. Dale Tuggy, professor of philosophy at the State University of NY at Fredonia. Tuggy's razor sharp logic slices through many of the erroneous and unsound arguments commonly made by both trinitarians and unitarians. He argues that Jesus should be worshiped, and not just in a civic sense, but in a religious context. He employs careful reasoning to show that such an act is not idolatry. For Tuggy idolatry is not merely defined as worshiping a creature or worshiping anyone other than God, but worshiping someone or something in disobedience to God. Since God has exalted Jesus to his right hand and he has approved and wills that Jesus be honored, sung to, bowed to, etc., it is right to worship him. Worshiping Jesus is always done to the glory of God and so even if he is the direct object of worship, his Father is always the indirect object. This presentation deconstructed my previous position on this subject and erected in its place an understanding that is more robust, less pedantic, and quite freeing. Anyone interested in the question, "Should Christians Worship Jesus?" should watch these videos. These are also available on Youtube: part one | part two.

Is Philippians 2.5-9 about a Pre-Existent Being?  [9 pages]
by Ray Faircloth rated at 1.0 (6 votes so far)

PHILIPPIANS 2:5-9 is best read from a word for word Greek interlinear translation. Because of a docetic and often trinitarian pre-existence bias, our current translations do not accurately express the thoughts of these verses. Of course, some translations are better than others and all render many parts of these texts accurately.

What's in a Vowel Point?  [4 pages]
by Anthony Buzzard rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

Who is Jesus? God, or Unique Man? What’s in a Vowel Point? The Difference between God and Man. A study of the difference between Adoni and Adonai.

Plain Talk About Who God Is  [2 pages]
by Anthony Buzzard rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

Trying to read the Bible without understanding who the God of the Bible is is likely to be frustrating. Unfortunately so much pressure and dogmatism now surrounds the issue of who God is that Christians are unable to approach the text of Scripture with an open mind. A great measure of fear attends their studies, because they have been told what kind of a God they are to find in the Bible, or else...hellfire! This is a hopeless atmosphere for calm and reasoned investigation. The matter of deciding who God is in the Bible is relatively simple, if we follow sound procedure.

Hearing the Text of the Bible: Only One God  [2 pages]
by Anthony Buzzard rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

While churches and ministries unite under the conviction that "there is One God existing eternally in three Persons," Paul thought otherwise. It is surprising that Bible readers do not hear the difference between "There is One God - the Father, the Son and the Holy Spirit" (historic creeds) and "There is One God, the Father" (Paul, in I Cor. 8:6).

The Shema (Truth Matters)  [28:06]
by Brian Kelly rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

Brian Kelly has been studying the Bible for over three decades and leads a home fellowship in Syracuse, NY. On this show he talks about the importance of the core creed of the Bible: the Shema. The word "Shema" means "Hear" or "Listen up" and it is the shorthand way of referring to Deuteronomy 6.4-5.

"Hear, O Israel! The LORD is our God, the LORD is one! You shall love the LORD your God with all your heart and with all your soul and with all your might."

When a Jewish scribe asked Jesus what the foremost commandment was, Jesus immediately quoted this text. This tells us that the God Jesus worshiped is the same as the God of Moses and the Old Testament.

In this show, Brian leads us to consider the two parts to the Shema. (1) To recognize that Yahweh alone is our single God (2) to love this God with everything (holding nothing back). Download this file to learn more about biblical monotheism and how to avoid the pitfalls of ancient Israel's idolatry.

ISAIAH 9:6 - "Wonderful Counselor"  [39:29]
by Chuck Jones rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

In this four-part series, Pastor Chuck examines the meanings of the titles in this prophecy from Isaiah 9:6 and the biblical application for us. Today's study is on the "Wonderful Counselor." Scriptures: Isaiah 9:1-6; Psalms 119:129,100; Luke 8:25; Isaiah 11:1,2; Matthew 7:29; Proverbs 13:10; John 1:1,2,3,14,18; 5:19; 6:63,68; Colossians 3:16; Romans 15:14

ISAIAH 9:6 - "Everlasting Father"  [29:42]
by Chuck Jones rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

In this continuing series from Isaiah 9:6, Pastor Chuck examines the meanings of the titles in this prophecy and the biblical application for us. Today's study is on the "Everlasting Father." Scriptures: Isaiah 9:1-6; Genesis 6:3,4; 9:12; 17; 21:33; 2 Sam. 7:12-14; 2 Kings 2:12; Job 29:16; Isaiah 22:21; Rom. 4:16; Gal. 3:7; John 8:56; Micah 5:2

ISAIAH 9:6 - "Prince of Peace"  [31:19]
by Chuck Jones rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

In this continuing series from Isaiah 9:6, Pastor Chuck examines the meanings of the titles in this prophecy and the biblical application for us. Today's study is on the "Prince of Peace."

What This Man Did For Us  [35:19]
by Chuck Jones rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

A great gulf existed between God and man. Blind sinners were unable to approach the eternal Father. A "go-between" was needed. Someone to lift us up. And then came the man Christ Jesus, the great Mediator between God and sinners. Scriptures: Isaiah 1:18; 57:15; Zechariah 13:7; Deuteronomy 17:14,15; 18:15; 5:23-25; 1 Timothy 2:5; Romans 5:15-19; 8:29; Ephesians 4:20-23; 1 Corinthians 15:20; 3:3

A Deafening Silence  [2 pages]
by David Maas rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

Why is there no evidence in the New Testament of Jewish objections to the doctrines of the Trinity, the deity of Christ or the Incarnation? The New Testament records objections to a crucified messiah as well as disputes over circumcision, Sabbath keeping, dietary regulations and eating food offered to idols. Moreover, ideas like the Trinity and God “becoming man” are so unique and difficult to comprehend that one would expect a thoroughgoing teacher like the Apostle Paul to address them constantly, yet nowhere in his epistles is there an example of him attempting to explain the inexplicable to his congregations. Nowhere does Paul discuss how the one God can be “three persons in one” or teach how in Christ Jesus “God became a man.” Such lessons would have required constant repetition.

A "Preexistent" Jesus in Philippians 2:6-11?  [5 pages]
by David Maas rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

Philippians 2:5-11 is not Paul’s attempt to explain the “Incarnation” or how a divine being divested himself of his divine prerogatives. It is not an exposition about the preexistence of Christ. Instead Paul uses a real life example from the life of Jesus to illustrate his appeal for humility and mutual submission. Like Adam Jesus was in the “form of God.” Unlike Adam he did not attempt to become “like God.” Instead he chose to deny himself his rights and took on the form of a servant. In obedience to his Father he embraced the shameful death of the cross rather than attempt to seize likeness with God.

The Jesus of the First Christian Sermon  [2 pages]
by David Maas rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

The Christology of Peter in this first sermon is relatively simple. He treats Jesus as a genuine human being from Nazareth who actually died on the cross. Nowhere in his sermon does Peter hint at the idea of Jesus being a Divine being or as having existed before his birth.

Does Paul call Jesus God in Romans 9.5  [3 pages]
by David Maas rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

Romans 9:5 does not call Jesus “God.” Instead, it is a declaration of praise to God offered immediately before Paul’s question, had the Word of God failed? It affirmed that Paul did not doubt even for an instance that God’s word had not failed.

The Exaltation of Jesus in the Epistle to the Hebrews  [4 pages]
by David Maas rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

The Epistle to the Hebrews presents a consistent picture of the Son of God who was resurrected and exalted to the right hand of God because of his faithful self-sacrifice. The Author of Hebrews bases the present exalted status of the Son not on metaphysical speculations about the Divine nature of the Eternal Son or how the “persons” of the Trinity relate to one another, but rather on the historical events of the obedience, death, resurrection and exaltation of Jesus, the Son “made like unto his brothers and sisters in all ways apart from sin.”

Does Paul call Jesus "God" in Titus 2:13?  [5 pages]
by David Maas rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

The Granville Sharp Rule used to argue for TITUS 2:13 as a statement of Jesus’ deity is invalid. The passage instead has two persons in view, “the great God” and “Christ Jesus, our savior.” This is in keeping with Paul’s usage elsewhere in Titus and his other letters, as well as in the rest of the New Testament.

Does Peter call Jesus "God" in 2 Peter 1:1?  [5 pages]
by David Maas rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

In summary, the Granville Sharp Rule used to argue 2 Peter 1:1 is a statement of the deity of Jesus is invalid. This grammatical rule was “discovered” rather late by a well-intentioned Christian who was specifically looking for grammatical patterns that would “prove” the deity of Christ. Instead 2 Peter 1:1 has two persons in view, “our God” and the “savior, Jesus Christ.”

Does John 1:18 call Jesus "God?"  [4 pages]
by David Maas rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

John 1:18 most likely originally read “only begotten Son,” not “only begotten God.” There is strong Greek manuscript evidence supporting this reading and it is in line with John’s usage elsewhere. The proposed reading “only begotten god” raises serious theological problems that some translators have attempted to solve with paraphrases such as “one and only god” and “unique god.” Each proposed solution only heightens the theological and logical problems.

The Early Shift from Historical Jesus to Pre-existence  [1 page]
by Friedrich Loofs rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

The Hidden Flaw in Traditional Christianity: A Perversion of Monotheism. A short quotation from Friedrich Loofs, church historian, who lived from 1858-1928.

The Trinity: Truth or Tragedy  [170:53]
by Greer Dixon & Mages vs. Coleangelo Sarkisian & Enochs rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

This, the first of three public debates clashing the ideas of the Trinity vs. Biblical Unitarianism (not to be confused with Universalist Unitarianism), also called strict monotheism, was held in Riverside, California on Friday, December 30, 2005.

This debate, moderated by Steve Scianni, is a discussion between conservative Trinitarian and Unitarian Christians who both share a high respect for the grammatico-historical method of hermeneutics (exegesis and interpretation).

Arguing for biblical Unitarianism are Lee Greer, Danny Andre Dixon, moderator of the Disciples for One God discussion forum (http://4OneGod.net), and Dan Mages (http://HungerTruth.com).

At the Trinitarian table, coached by Dr. Robert Morey of Faith Defenders Christian Ministry (www.faithdefenders.com), are Gabriel Coleangelo (Pastor of DC Christian Fellowship, Moreno Valley, CA), Mike Sarkisian (Pastor of DC Christian Fellowship, Moreno Valley), and Edward Enochs, Reformed Presuppositional apologist in the tradition of Cornelius Van Til and prolific blogger for the society.

The 2 hour 51 minute discussion was videotaped by Michael Hawkins and M.G. Dockery in the auditorium of the historic First Congregational Church 3504 Mission Avenue, Riverside, California (Rev. Jane Quandt, Senior Minister).

How Great is Our God  [25:07]
by Jack Hearp rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

An antique's value is often related to its individuality, craftsmanship, and detail. Written through the pages of the Bible are the unique words of the one true God, who has individually created each person, and values us enough to offer a way of salvation through his perfect Son.

Scriptural Study on the Trinity  [20 pages]
by Jay Dicken rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

A thorough examination of many key concepts and verses commonly used to support the doctrine of the Trinity.

Echad and "Compound Unity"  [1 page]
by Jay Dicken rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

A brief examination of the claim that "one" (Hebrew: echad) can mean "compound unity."

Why Does the Bible Call Jesus God?  [2 pages]
by Jay Dicken rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

Although Jesus is called God in the Bible, so were Moses and the judges of Israel. Join Jay Dicken as he unravels this mystery, showing that God's representatives can sometimes be called "God."

How Can Jesus' Death Save Us If He Is not God?  [1 page]
by Jay Dicken rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

The value of Christ's sacrifice lay in his human nature. So to insist that Jesus had to be God for his sacrifice to have value flies in the face of Paul's writings. If it is within the purposes of God to provide salvation by His Son, how can we whose thoughts are beneath His thoughts question and challenge His way of doing things?

Didn't Christ Do Things Only God Can Do?  [1 page]
by Jay Dicken rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

God has the right, the authority, and the ability to endow anyone whom He chooses with those attributes that He wants him to have.

Did Jesus Claim to Be God?  [1 page]
by Jay Dicken rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

In John 5.18 and John 10.38, the Jews thought Jesus was claiming equality with God, but they were wrong. Jesus was calling God “his own Father;” he was not claiming to be God.

Elohim and Genesis 1.26  [2 pages]
by Jay Dicken rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

It is true that in a few verses the first-person plural pronoun is used, but in the vast majority of verses the first-person singular pronoun is used, even though its antecedent is plural! This is a significant grammatical anomaly. To whom might God be talking at Genesis 1:26?

Seeing Jesus Is Seeing the Father  [1 page]
by Jay Dicken rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

In John 14.9 Jesus says "He who has seen me has seen the Father." What did he mean by this enigmatic statement?

Did Jesus Call Himself the "I Am?"  [1 page]
by Jay Dicken rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

Was Jesus applying the title I AM to himself? Interestingly, someone other than Jesus uses this exact same Greek phrase only ten verses later. At John 9:9 a man whom Jesus had healed also says “I am.” [ego eimi] Should we conclude that this man is part of a triune God? Certainly not, so the simple statement I am does not prove deity.

Did Jesus Claim to Be the "I Am" in John 18.6?  [1 page]
by Jay Dicken rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

To understand why those who came to arrest Jesus drew back and fell to the ground, we must discern what they expected might happen when they encountered Jesus.

Jesus Is Called God in Hebrews 1.8   [< 1 page]
by Jay Dicken rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

The key to understanding this verse is to recognize it is a quote from Psalm 45.6 where it refers to a king of Israel.

Jesus Is Called My Lord and My God  [< 1 page]
by Jay Dicken rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

If God can call human judges who were supposed to act as His representatives “gods” without meaning it literally, why couldn’t Thomas call the one who has been appointed as God’s representative to judge all the earth “God” without meaning it literally?

Do Titus 2.13 and 2 Peter 1.1 Call Jesus God?  [< 1 page]
by Jay Dicken rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

In Titus 3:4 he is called the “Goodness and Loving-kindness of God, our Savior.” In 2 Peter 1:1 he is called the “Righteousness of our God, and Savior.” So in these passages Jesus is not being called God.

Jesus Was in the Form of God  [< 1 page]
by Jay Dicken rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

If Paul meant to say that Jesus was God in Philippians 2:6 he could have simply written that Jesus ‘was God,’ and omitted the phrase ‘in the form of.’ What did Paul mean by this expression?

Jesus and God Share Many Titles  [2 pages]
by Jay Dicken rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

Jesus shares titles with God. Among these are “King of kings, and Lord of lords,” and “Alpha and the Omega, the First and the Last.” The Bible calls Jesus our Savior and says that besides God there is no Savior. (Acts 5:31; Isaiah 43:11) Also, there are passages of Scripture which are applied to God in the Hebrew Scriptures, yet applied to Jesus in the New Testament.

Jesus Is Emmanuel  [< 1 page]
by Jay Dicken rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

Emmanuel means "God with us." The historical context is the key to unlocking the meaning of this name.

Shoul We Pray to and Worship Jesus?  [1 page]
by Jay Dicken rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

Should Christians pray to Jesus? Should we worship him? If we do, does that mean he is God?

Is Jesus Called Yahweh in Romans 10.13?  [< 1 page]
by Jay Dicken rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

Joel 2:32 was also quoted by Peter at Acts 2:21 while preaching to Jews who had not accepted Jesus as the Christ (Messiah). Unlike Peter, Paul was not addressing unbelievers, but Roman Christians. They already understood that ‘calling upon the name of the Lord’ God included accepting Jesus as Lord and Christ. Jesus said that “no one comes to the Father, but by me.” Therefore, one has to call upon Jesus (the name means Yahweh Saves) to call upon Yahweh God. So while there appears to be a blurring of the scriptural application in Romans 10:13, there is no warrant for trinitarian conclusions. -- John 14:6

Acts 5.3 and the Holy Spirit  [< 1 page]
by Jay Dicken rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

Jesus called the holy spirit the “finger of God;” so the holy spirit is God’s instrument of activity, and the Bible associates God’s spirit with His power. Therefore, the holy spirit should not be regarded as a person, whether as part of a trinity or as a totally separate person; but it is reflective of Personality, and that Personality is God (the Father).

Acts 13.1-5 and the Holy Spirit  [< 1 page]
by Jay Dicken rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

Here the holy spirit is being used as a means of communication by the Lord. I might say, ‘The radio said that there is going to be rain today.’ Do you conclude from this that the radio is a person? Or that a person is utilizing this mode of communication?

Understanding Matthew 28.19  [< 1 page]
by Jay Dicken rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

That there are a Father, and Son, and holy spirit, we do not contest. That there is an important relationship between Them, we do not contest. But that this relationship is trinitarian, we do contest.

Does the Spirit Have a Will in 1 Corinthians 12.11?  [< 1 page]
by Jay Dicken rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

The holy spirit is reflective of Personality, and that Personality can be the Father’s or the Son’s. This principle applies in every context used to prove personality of the holy spirit.

Masculine Pronouns and the Holy Spirit in John  [< 1 page]
by Jay Dicken rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

Some foreign languages have what is called grammatical gender, which has nothing to do with personality or sexual gender. For example, in Spanish the word mesa means table and is feminine. But this does not mean that they regard it as a person or as female. The same is true for Bible Greek and Hebrew.

God Alone  [35:24]
by Jeff Fletcher rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

What is the foundation of our faith? Why were we created? We bring God glory through the worship and service of him alone. There is no mixing loyalty. We must live out our belief. Scripture references: Genesis 2:18; Isaiah 43:7; Deuteronomy 6:1-6; John 17:3; 1 Corinthians 8:6-7; James 2:18-20

I Believe in the Holy Spirit  [33:03]
by Jeff Fletcher rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

What exactly is the "Holy Spirit?" Is the Holy Spirit a ghost or something mystical, and why is the Holy Spirit important in a believer's life? Scripture references: Genesis 1:1,2; 1 Corinthians 2:4-12; Numbers 11:24-28; Joel 2:28,29; Luke 1:30-35; 3:21; John 7:37; Acts 1:8; Ephesians 1:13; Romans 8:1; Galatians 5:16-24

The Unity of God  [40:36]
by Jeff Fletcher rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

not available

Commentary on Philippians 2.6-8  [7 page]
by John Schoenheit rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

These verses in Philippians are very important to Trinitarian doctrine (although they have also caused division among Trinitarians) and they must be dealt with thoroughly. There are several arguments wrapped into these two verses, and we will deal with them point by point.

Commentary on Deuteronomy 6.4  [2 pages]
by John Schoenheit, Mark Graeser, and John Lynn rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

It is believed by some that the Hebrew word "one" (echad) that is used in Deuteronomy 6:4 and other verses indicates a "compound unity." This is just not true. Used with permission from biblicalunitarian.com

Commentary on Genesis 1.1  [3 pages]
by John Schoenheit, Mark Graeser, and John Lynn rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

The word "God" is Elohim, which is itself a plural form and, like most other words, has more than one definition. It is used in a plural sense of "gods" or "men with authority," and in a singular sense for "God," "god," or "a man with authority, such as a judge." Used with permission from biblicalunitarian.com

Commentary on Genesis 16.7-13  [4 pages]
by John Schoenheit, Mark Graeser, and John Lynn rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

It is believed by some Trinitarians that in the Old Testament "the angel of the Lord" is Jesus Christ before he supposedly "incarnated" as a human. This point is disputed by many, and with good reason. There is not a single verse that actually says that Jesus Christ is the angel of the Lord. The entire doctrine is built from assumption. Used with permission from biblicalunitarian.com

Commentary on Genesis 18.1-2  [5 pages]
by John Schoenheit, Mark Graeser, and John Lynn rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

These verses pose a problem for Christians who have been taught that no one has ever seen God. The Hebrew text clearly says that Yahweh appeared to Abraham in the form of a man, and He was with two angels, who also took on human appearance.Used with permission from biblicalunitarian.com

Commentary on Isaiah 9.6  [2 pages]
by John Schoenheit, Mark Graeser, and John Lynn rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

The context illuminates great truth about the verse, and also shows that there is no justification for believing that it refers to the Trinity, but rather to God's appointed ruler.Used with permission from biblicalunitarian.com

Commentary on Jeremiah 17.5  [1 page]
by John Schoenheit, Mark Graeser, and John Lynn rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

Occasionally, a Trinitarian will argue that Jesus cannot be a man because we are expected to trust Jesus, but not to trust men. We feel that analysis misses the point of this verse, and we remind the reader that the entire verse and its context must be read to get its proper meaning.Used with permission from biblicalunitarian.com

Commentary on Micah 5.2  [1 page]
by John Schoenheit, Mark Graeser, and John Lynn rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

No Jew ever thought God could be born, and the thought of the Creator of the Heavens and earth having brothers was absurd to them. These verses are speaking of God's anointed king, and the Word declares, not that this ruler will be God, but rather that Yahweh will be "his God" (v. 4).Used with permission from biblicalunitarian.com

Commentary on Proverbs 8.23  [1 page]
by John Schoenheit, Mark Graeser, and John Lynn rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

Occasionally, a Trinitarian will use this verse to try to support the Trinity and the preexistence of Christ by saying that "wisdom" was appointed from eternity, Christ is the "wisdom of God" (1 Cor. 1:24) and, therefore, Christ was from eternity. This position has not found strong support even among Trinitarians, and for good reason.Used with permission from biblicalunitarian.com

Commentary on Psalm 110.1  [5 pages]
by John Schoenheit, Mark Graeser, and John Lynn rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

Trinitarian commentators frequently argue that "my Lord" in this verse is the Hebrew word adonai, another name for God, and is therefore proof of the divinity of the Messiah. But not only is this not a valid argument, this verse is actually one of the great proofs of the complete humanity of the promised Messiah.Used with permission from biblicalunitarian.com

Commentary on 1 Timothy 6.14-16  [2 pages]
by John Schoenheit, Mark Graeser, and John Lynn rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

It is stated by Trinitarians that since God is called "King of kings and Lord of lords," as is Christ, that Christ must be God. However, simply because the same title is used for two individuals does not mean that they are actually somehow one being.

Commentary on 2 Corinthians 5.19  [1 page]
by John Schoenheit, Mark Graeser, and John Lynn rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

As this verse is translated in the NIV, it does not have a Trinitarian meaning. Some Trinitarians use the concept from some other translations that "God was in Christ" to prove the Trinity. If the Trinity were true, then God could not be "in" Christ as if Christ were a container. If the Trinity were in fact a true doctrine, then this would be a wonderful place to express it and say, “God was Christ.”

Commentary on 2 Corinthians 13.14  [2 pages]
by John Schoenheit, Mark Graeser, and John Lynn rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

This closing verse of the epistle of 2 Corinthians is a doxology, and is typical of how Paul closes his epistles. Galatians, Philippians and both Thessalonian epistles close with “the grace of our Lord Jesus Christ.” The close of Ephesians includes “love with faith from God.” There is no reason to conclude that a closing doxology would not incorporate three wonderful attributes: the love of God, the grace of Christ and the fellowship of the spirit.

Commentary on 2 Corinthians 12.19b  [1 page]
by John Schoenheit, Mark Graeser, and John Lynn rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

The Greek text contains a difficult construction, and reads, “God in Christ,” which has caused some to believe it is a reference to the Trinity. Not at all. If anything, it tends to refute the Trinity

Commentary on 2 Peter 1.1b  [2 pages]
by John Schoenheit, Mark Graeser, and John Lynn rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

Some Trinitarians try to force this verse to “prove” the Trinity by what is known as the Granville Sharp Rule of Greek grammar. We have shown that this is not a valid proof of the Trinity

Commentary on 2 Thessalonians 1.12  [1 page]
by John Schoenheit, Mark Graeser, and John Lynn rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

Some Trinitarians try to force this verse to “prove” the Trinity by what is known as the Granville Sharp Rule of Greek grammar. We have shown that this is not a valid proof of the Trinity

Commentary on 2 Timothy 4.1  [1 page]
by John Schoenheit, Mark Graeser, and John Lynn rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

There is no logical reason for this verse to have a double reference to Christ by making the word “God” refer to Jesus Christ, thus removing “God” (normally understood to be the Father) from the verse entirely.

Commentary on Acts 5.3-4  [2 pages]
by John Schoenheit, Mark Graeser, and John Lynn rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

We must understand that both “God” and “pneuma hagion” (“holy spirit”) can refer to something other than a separate “person” in the Trinity. Since there is no verse that actually states the doctrine of the Trinity, its existence is built from assumption and by piecing verses together. Verses such as Acts 5:3 and 4 are used as “proof,” for the doctrine, but that is actually circular reasoning.

Commentary on Acts 7:45  [2 pages]
by John Schoenheit, Mark Graeser, and John Lynn rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

Although the King James English makes this verse a little hard to understand, it is saying that Jesus was the one who brought the Israelites into the Promised Land. This is a case of mistranslation. The name “Jesus” and the name “Joshua” are the same, and on two occasions the translators of the KJV confused them. This point is well established by William Barclay, a professor and author at Trinity College in Glasgow.

Commentary on Acts 7.59  [1 page]
by John Schoenheit, Mark Graeser, and John Lynn rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

This verse supports the idea of the Trinity only as it appears in some translations.

Commentary on Acts 20.28b  [1 page]
by John Schoenheit, Mark Graeser, and John Lynn rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

There are some Greek manuscripts that read “the church of the Lord” instead of “the church of God.” Many Trinitarian scholars believe that “Lord” is the original reading, because there is no mention anywhere in the Bible of God having blood. If the Greek manuscripts that read “Lord” are the original ones, then the “problem” is solved. However, it is the belief of the authors that good textual research shows that “the church of God” is the correct reading.

Commentary on Colossians 2.2  [2 pages]
by John Schoenheit, Mark Graeser, and John Lynn rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

This verse, although not usually considered a Trinitarian verse, is occasionally used to show that the mystery of God is Christ (i.e., that Christ is both God and Man, and thus a “mystery”).

Commentary on Colossians 2.9  [2 pages]
by John Schoenheit, Mark Graeser, and John Lynn rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

The word “Deity” or “Godhead” is a translation of the Greek word theotes. In A Greek English Lexicon, by Liddell and Scott, the classic lexicon of the ancient Greek language, it is translated as “divinity, divine nature.” In making their case, Liddell and Scott cite Greek authors Plutarch and Lucian, and also reference Heliodorus and Oribasius using the phrase dia theoteta = “for religious reasons.” The Greek word occurs only once in the Bible, so to try to build a case for it meaning “God” or “Godhead” (which is an unclear term in itself) is very suspect indeed.

Commentary on Ephesians 1.22 and 23  [1 page]
by John Schoenheit, Mark Graeser, and John Lynn rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

There are some Trinitarians who assert that the last phrase of verse 23 proves the Trinity. Not so, for there is no mention of any Trinitarian concept such as “three-in-one.” This verse clearly teaches that God was the one who “appointed” Christ to be over the Church. Surely if Christ were a co-equal part of God, he needed no such appointment, because by nature he would already have been over the Church.

Commentary on Ephesians 3.9  [1 page]
by John Schoenheit, Mark Graeser, and John Lynn rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

This verse is not a problem in most translations, because most do not have the phrase, “by Jesus Christ,” at the end of the verse. Apparently this phrase was added to some Greek manuscripts as debates about the Trinity caused some scribes to “augment” their position by adding to the Word of God, or it could have been a marginal note that was accidentally copied into some manuscripts.

Commentary on Ephesians 4.7 and 8  [2 pages]
by John Schoenheit, Mark Graeser, and John Lynn rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

Verse 8 is a quotation from the Old Testament, where the context is referring to what God did, so there are some who say that if the verse is applied to Christ, then Christ must be God. However, it is common for a verse is to be interpreted one way in the Old Testament and then applied or interpreted differently in the New Testament.

Commentary on Ephesians 5.5  [5 pages]
by John Schoenheit, Mark Graeser, and John Lynn rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

Using this verse, some Trinitarians try to make Christ into God by what is known as the “Granville Sharp Rule.” The following explanation is lengthy, but it is necessary to show that this “rule” has been properly analyzed and shown to be invalid for proving the Trinity. Granville Sharp was an English philanthropist, who began to study the grammar of the New Testament in order to demonstrate that his Trinitarian beliefs were correct and that Christ was God. From his study of the New Testament, he declared that when the Greek word kai (usually translated “and”) joins two nouns of the same case, and the first noun has the definite article and the second does not, the two nouns refer to the same subject. This is the principle behind the “rule,” but there are a large number of exceptions to it that must be noted.

Commentary on 1 Corinthians 8.6  [2 pages]
by John Schoenheit, Mark Graeser, and John Lynn rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

Trinitarians say that this verse supports their position because of the final phrase in the verse, i.e., that all things came through Jesus Christ. But what the verse actually says is that all things came "from" God, "through" Jesus. This testimony stands in contradiction to Trinitarian doctrine because it places Jesus in a subordinate role to God. According to this verse, he is not "co-equal" with the Father.

Commentary on 1 Corinthians 10.4  [2 pages]
by John Schoenheit, Mark Graeser, and John Lynn rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

This verse is only a problem if it is misunderstood or mistranslated. Some Trinitarians use it to teach that Christ was actually with the Israelites, following them around. However, the Old Testament makes no mention of Christ being with the Israelites in the wilderness. And if he had been, he certainly would not have been "following" them.

Commentary on 1 Corinthians 10.9  [2 pages]
by John Schoenheit, Mark Graeser, and John Lynn rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

The reason this verse is a problem verse is that the Greek manuscripts differ. Some texts read "Christ," while others read "the Lord." As it is translated in versions like the NIV, Amplified, NASB and others that take the word "Lord" as original, there is no problem at all. This verse is only a problem in some versions that have "Christ" instead of "the Lord."

Commentary on 1 Corinthians 12.4,6  [1 page]
by John Schoenheit, Mark Graeser, and John Lynn rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

The verses speak of three: God, Christ and the spirit, but do not speak of a Trinitarian formula. We put "spirit" with a lower case "s" because it refers to God's gift of holy spirit that is born in each believer.

Commentary on 1 John 2.22  [2 pages]
by John Schoenheit, Mark Graeser, and John Lynn rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

It is said in some Christian circles that: "If you do not believe that Jesus Christ is God, you are of the spirit of the antichrist." 1 John 2:22 has often been used to support this idea.

Commentary on 1 John 3.16  [1 page]
by John Schoenheit, Mark Graeser, and John Lynn rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

The King James Version reads as if "God" laid His life down for us. The problem is caused by mistranslation. However, the informed reader will see the solution, even in the KJV text itself.

Commentary on 1 John 4.1-3  [3 pages]
by John Schoenheit, Mark Graeser, and John Lynn rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

Many Christians use the above verses in an attempt to prove that one must believe that Jesus is God in order to be saved. We assert that this is not at all what the verses are saying. To understand them, it is most important that we read what is written, and not add our interpolation to the text. Then, to really understand why they were written the way they are, we must understand the cultural context in which they were written, as well as the overall context of 1 John itself.

Commentary on 1 John 5.7-8  [3 pages]
by John Schoenheit, Mark Graeser, and John Lynn rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

The King James Version has words that support the Trinity that most modern versions do not have. How can this be? The reason that there are different translations of this verse is that some Greek texts contain an addition that was not original, and that addition was placed into some English versions, such as the KJV.

Commentary on 1 John 5.20  [3 pages]
by John Schoenheit, Mark Graeser, and John Lynn rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

Many Trinitarians claim that the final sentence in the verse, "This is the true God," refers to Jesus Christ, since the closest noun to "This" is "Jesus Christ." However, since God and Jesus are both referred to in the first sentence of the verse, the final sentence can refer to either one of them. The word "this," which begins the last sentence, is houtos, and a study of it will show that the context, not the closest noun or pronoun, must determine to whom "this" is referring. The Bible provides examples of this

Commentary 1 Timothy 5.21  [1 page]
by John Schoenheit, Mark Graeser, and John Lynn rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

This verse has an element that is very hard to explain if the Trinity is true, and makes perfect sense if it is not. Paul charges Timothy by God, by Christ and by "the elect angels." This fits beautifully with what we teach; i.e., that there is the one God, and there is the man Jesus who has been made "Lord and Christ," but there is no "person" called "the Holy Spirit." If there were a Trinity composed of three co-equal, co-eternal "persons," why would Paul charge Timothy by the "elect angels" and leave the "Holy Spirit" out of the picture?

Commentary on Hebrews 1.2  [3 pages]
by John Schoenheit, Mark Graeser, John Lynn rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

1. The Greek word translated “universe” (or “world” in many translations) is the plural of the Greek word aion, and actually means “ages.” There are other Greek words that mean “world,” such as kosmos and oikoumene, and when the Devil tempted Jesus by showing him all the kingdoms of the “world,” these words are used. This verse is referring to the “ages,” not the “world.”

Commentary on Hebrews 1.8  [4 pages]
by John Schoenheit, Mark Graeser, John Lynn rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

The verse is a quotation from Psalm 45:6,7. The Jews read this verse for centuries and, knowing the flexibility of the word “God,” never concluded that the Messiah would somehow be part of a Triune God.

Commentary Hebrews 1.10  [2 pages]
by John Schoenheit, Mark Graeser, John Lynn rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

This verse is quoted from the Old Testament (Ps.102:25), where it applied to Yahweh, and the author of Hebrews is lifting it from the Psalms and applying it to Jesus Christ. The subject of the verse changes from Yahweh (Old Testament) to Jesus Christ (New Testament). It makes sense, therefore, that the action being attributed changes also.

Commentary on Hebrews 2.16  [1 page]
by John Schoenheit, Mark Graeser, John Lynn rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

Because in the context, it so clearly states that Jesus was “like his brothers in every way” (v. 17), there can be no reference to the Trinity in this verse. If the Trinity is correct and Jesus had both an eternal nature and human nature, he is hardly like us “in every way.”

Commentary on Hewbrews 4.8  [1 Page]
by John Schoenheit, Mark Graeser, John Lynn rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

In some versions, the name “Joshua” was mistranslated as “Jesus,” which makes it sound as if Jesus were in the Old Testament. The names “Jesus” and “Joshua” are the same in Hebrew and Greek, and the translators of the KJV, for example, confused the names.

Commentary Hebrews 7.3  [1 Page]
by John Schoenheit, Mark Graeser, John Lynn rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

There are some Trinitarians who teach that Melchizedek was actually Jesus Christ because this verse says he was without Father or mother, beginning or end of life, etc. This cannot be the case, and misses the point of this entire section of Scripture

Commentary Hebrews 13.8  [1 page]
by John Schoenheit, Mark Graeser, John Lynn rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

Believers were being led astray by new teachings, and the author of Hebrews was reminding them that Jesus Christ does not change. The truth about him yesterday is the same now and will be the same in the future.

Commentary on John 1.1  [8 pages]
by John Schoenheit, Mark Graeser, John Lynn rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

To fully understand any passage of Scripture, it is imperative to study the context. To fully understand John 1:1, the rest of the chapter needs to be understood as well, and the rest of the chapter adds more understanding to John 1:1. We believe that these notes on John 1:1, read together with the rest of John 1 and our notes on John 1:3,10,14,15, and 18 will help make the entire first chapter of John more understandable.

Commentary on John 1.3  [4 pages]
by John Schoenheit, Mark Graeser, John Lynn rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

The opening of John reveals this simple truth in a beautiful way: “In the beginning there was one God, who had reason, purpose and a plan, which was, by its very nature and origin, divine. It was through and on account of this reason, plan and purpose that everything was made. Nothing was made outside its scope. Then, this plan became flesh in the person of Jesus Christ and tabernacled among us.” Understanding the opening of John this way fits with the whole of Scripture and is entirely acceptable from a translation standpoint.

Commentary on John 1.10  [1 page]
by John Schoenheit, Mark Graeser, John Lynn rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

This verse is a reference to the Father, not to Christ. A study of the context reveals that this section opens in verse 6 by telling us, “There came a man who was sent by God.” We are told, “God is light,” and that God’s light shown through Jesus Christ and made him “the light of the world.”

Commentary on John 1.14  [2 Pages]
by John Schoenheit, Mark Graeser, John Lynn rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

The “Word” is the wisdom, plan or purpose of God (see John 1:1) and the Word “became flesh” as Jesus Christ. Thus, Jesus Christ was “the Word in the flesh,” which is shortened to “the Word” for ease of speaking.

Commentary on John 1.18  [2 Pages]
by John Schoenheit, Mark Graeser, John Lynn rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

Even if the original text reads “God” and not “Son,” that still does not prove the Trinity. The word “God” has a wider application in Hebrew, Aramaic and Greek than it does in English. It can be used of men who have divine authority (See John 10:33 and Heb. 1:8 below).

Commentary on John 2.19  [2 pages]
by John Schoenheit, Mark Graeser, John Lynn rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

Christ knew that by his thoughts and actions he could guarantee his own resurrection by being sinlessly obedient unto death. That made it legally possible for God to keep His promise of resurrecting Christ, who was without sin and therefore did not deserve death, the “wages of sin.”

Commentary John 2.24  [2 pages]
by John Schoenheit, Mark Graeser, John Lynn rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

Daniel knew Nebuchadnezzar’s dream, even though Nebuchadnezzar had not revealed it to anyone (Dan. 2:5 and 28ff). By saying that Jesus knew all men, Scripture confirms that he was, like the prophets of old, in communication with God.

Commentary John 3.13  [2 pages]
by John Schoenheit, Mark Graeser, John Lynn rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

No one thinks that we were in heaven with Christ and incarnated into the flesh. Christ said, “As you have sent me, I have sent them.” So, however we take the phrase that Christ sent us, that is how we should understand the phrase that God sent Christ.

Commentary on John 5.18  [1 page]
by John Schoenheit, Mark Graeser, John Lynn rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

Jesus was using God’s power and authority on earth, and was thus “equal” to God in the same way Joseph, who was using Pharaoh’s authority and power, was equal to Pharaoh.

Commentary on John 6.33  [1 page]
by John Schoenheit, Mark Graeser, John Lynn rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

See notes on John 3:13

Commentary on John 6.38  [1 Page]
by John Schoenheit, Mark Graeser, John Lynn rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

See notes on John 3:13.

Commentary on John 6.62  [1 page]
by John Schoenheit, Mark Graeser, John Lynn rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

This verse is referring to the resurrection of Christ. This fact is clear from studying the context. Because the translators have chosen to translate anabaino as “ascend,” people believe it refers to Christ’s ascension from earth as recorded in Acts 1:9, but Acts 1:9 does not use this word.

Commentary on John 6.64  [2 pages]
by John Schoenheit, Mark Graeser, John Lynn rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

Some Trinitarians act as if this verse proves that Jesus was God just because the word “beginning” is in the verse. Nothing could be further from the truth. Even a cursory word study will show that the word “beginning” has to be defined by its context.

Commentary on John 8.24  [1 page]
by John Schoenheit, Mark Graeser, John Lynn rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

Trinitarians occasionally cite this verse to try to show the necessity of believing their doctrine, and unfortunately sometimes even to intimidate those who doubt it. They supply the word “God” after “I am,” not from the text, but from the dictates of their doctrine, and make the verse read: “For if you believe not that I am [God], ye shall die in your sins.”

Commentary on John 8.58  [2 pages]
by John Schoenheit, Mark Graeser, John Lynn rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

Trinitarians argue that this verse states that Jesus said he was the “I am” (i.e., the Yahweh of the Old Testament), so he must be God. This is just not the case. Saying “I am” does not make a person God.

Commentary on John 10.18  [1 page]
by John Schoenheit, Mark Graeser, John Lynn rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

See the notes on John 2:19.

Commentary on John 10.30  [1 page]
by John Schoenheit, Mark Graeser, John Lynn rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

He said that no one could take them out of his hand and that no one could take them out of his Father’s hand. Then he said that he and the Father were “one,” i.e., had one purpose, which was to keep and protect the sheep.

Commentary on John 10.33  [2 Pages]
by John Schoenheit, Mark Graeser, John Lynn rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

They called him what they believed he was—a “man.” They were offended because they believed that he, “being a man, made himself a god (i.e., someone with divine status).

Commentary on John 14.11  [1 Page]
by John Schoenheit, Mark Graeser, John Lynn rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

This verse is sometimes used to prove the Trinity, but it proves nothing of the kind. The exact same language about being “in” is used many times of Christians.

Commentary on John 14.16-17  [1 Page]
by John Schoenheit, Mark Graeser, John Lynn rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

Some people assert that “the Holy Spirit” is a person because the Bible has “he” and “him” in these verses in John and in some other places. This assertion is invalid because the gender of the noun and pronoun have nothing to do with whether or not a person or thing is actually a person.

Commentary on John 17.5  [2 pages]
by John Schoenheit, Mark Graeser, John Lynn rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

There is no question that Jesus “existed” before the world began. But did he exist literally as a person or in God’s foreknowledge, “in the mind of God?”

Commentary on John 20.17  [1 Page]
by John Schoenheit, Mark Graeser, John Lynn rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

It is hard to see how Jesus can be assumed to be co-equal and co-eternal with God when he calls Him, “my God.” The Bible simply means what it says in this verse: God is indeed both our God and Jesus’ God.

Commentary on John 20.28  [2 pages]
by John Schoenheit, Mark Graeser, John Lynn rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

“My Lord and my God.” There is no mention of the Trinity in the context, and there is no reason to believe that the disciples would have even been aware of such a doctrine. Thomas spoke what he would have known: that the man Jesus who he thought was dead was alive and had divine authority.

Commentary on Jude 4  [1 Page]
by John Schoenheit, Mark Graeser, John Lynn rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

Modern textual research has shown that the word “God” in the phrase “the only Lord God” was not in the original text, but was added as the centuries progressed. Textual critics and translators recognize that fact and thus modern translations read in ways similar to the NASB (“our only Master and Lord, Jesus Christ”).

Commentary on Luke 1.35  [3 pages]
by John Schoenheit, Mark Graeser, John Lynn rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

There are some Trinitarians who insist that the term “Son of God” implies a pre- existence and that Jesus is God. Once the doctrine of pre-existence was propounded, a vocabulary had to be developed to support it, and thus non-biblical phrases such as “eternally begotten” and “eternal Son” were invented.

Commentary on Luke 1.47  [2 Pages]
by John Schoenheit, Mark Graeser, John Lynn rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

Some Trinitarians believe that Christ must be God because they are both called “Savior.” There are many references to God the Father being called “Savior.” That makes perfect sense because He is the author of the plan of salvation and is also very active in our salvation.

Commentary on Luke 5.20-21  [1 Page]
by John Schoenheit, Mark Graeser, John Lynn rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

There are those who believe that only God can forgive sins, but that is not true. For an explanation applicable to this verse, see Mark 2:7

Commentary on Luke 7.16  [1 Page]
by John Schoenheit, Mark Graeser, John Lynn rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

Occasionally, Trinitarians will cite this verse as proof that Jesus is God, because it states that God visited His people. However, that phrase in no way proves the Trinity. Any word or phrase in Scripture must be interpreted in light of both its immediate and remote contexts.

Commentary on Luke 8.39  [1 Page]
by John Schoenheit, Mark Graeser, John Lynn rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

God works His miracles through people. Thus, whenever a miracle is performed, there are thanks for the one who stood in faith and performed the miracle, and also thanks and glory to God who supplied the power and actually did the work.

Commentary on Mark 2.7  [1 page]
by John Schoenheit, Mark Graeser, John Lynn rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

John 20:23 records Jesus saying to them: “If you forgive anyone his sins, they are forgiven.” If the Pharisees were right, and only God can forgive sins, then God, Jesus and the apostles were all God, because they all had the authority to forgive sins.

Commentary on Matthew 4.10  []
by John Schoenheit, Mark Graeser, John Lynn rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

It is sometimes stated that since we are to worship only God, and, because we are also supposed to worship Jesus, therefore he must be God. That argument is not valid because, although there is a special worship that is reserved just for God, we can “worship” certain people as well.

Commentary on Matthew 9.2-3  [1 page]
by John Schoenheit, Mark Graeser, John Lynn rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

This is a similar record to Mark 2:7 and the explanation can be found there.

Commentary on Matthew 9-8   [1 page]
by John Schoenheit, Mark Graeser, John Lynn rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

Although this verse is sometimes used to “prove” that Christ is God, the verse actually militates against the idea. Scripture states very clearly that Jesus was a man.

Commentary on Matthew 28.18  [1 page]
by John Schoenheit, Mark Graeser, John Lynn rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

Carefully reading a verse is the only way to begin to properly interpret it. In this case, it is clear that Christ’s authority was given to him.

Commentary on Matthew 28.19  [3 pages]
by John Schoenheit, Mark Graeser, John Lynn rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

In reading the book of Matthew, we note that there is no presentation of the doctrine of the Trinity. Some prominent Trinitarians doubt that the apostles were even introduced to the doctrine until after they received holy spirit. It would be strange indeed for Christ to introduce the doctrine of the Trinity here in the next-to-last verse in the book without it being mentioned earlier.

Commentary on Matthew 28.20  [1 page]
by John Schoenheit, Mark Graeser, John Lynn rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

Occasionally this verse is used to prove the Trinity because it is said that the only way that Jesus could always be with his Church is if he were God. However, that is an unproven assumption, and is not stated in Scripture.

Commentary on Revelation 1.8  [2 pages]
by John Schoenheit, Mark Graeser, John Lynn rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

These words apply to God, not to Christ. The one, “who is, and who was and who is to come” is clearly identified from the context

Commentary on Revelation 1.11  [1 page]
by John Schoenheit, Mark Graeser, John Lynn rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

Some texts in the Western tradition add the words, “I am the Alpha and Omega” to this verse, but textual scholars agree that the phrase is an addition to the text, and thus versions like the NIV, NASB, etc., do not have the addition (see the notes on Rev. 1:8).

Commentary on Revelation 1.13-15  [2 pages]
by John Schoenheit, Mark Graeser, John Lynn rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

Many theologians have noticed the similarities between this description of Christ in Revelation, and the description of the “ancient of Days” (i.e., God) in Daniel 7:9 and Ezekiel 43:2. Thus, based on the similarities between the two descriptions, these verses are used to support the Trinity.

Commentary on Revelation 1.17  [2 pages]
by John Schoenheit, Mark Graeser, John Lynn rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

If other titles apply to God, Christ and men without making all of them into “one God,” then there is no reason to assume that this particular title would mean they were one God unless Scripture specifically told us so, which it does not.

Commentary on Revelation 3.14  [1 Page]
by John Schoenheit, Mark Graeser, John Lynn rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

As it is translated above, there is no Trinitarian inference in the verse. It agrees perfectly with what we know from the whole of Scripture: that God has made Jesus both Lord and Christ.

Commentary on Revelation 21.6  [1 Page]
by John Schoenheit, Mark Graeser, John Lynn rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

The exact meaning of the phrase “the Beginning and the End” is not given. Scholars give differing explanations of the phrase, but the meaning must be closely associated with the concepts of “Alpha and Omega” and “First and Last” because these titles are associated together

Commentary on Revelation 22.13  [1 page]
by John Schoenheit, Mark Graeser, John Lynn rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

or commentary on the phrase “Alpha and Omega,” see the notes on Revelation 1:8; on “the First and Last,” see the notes on Revelation 1:17; on “the Beginning and the End,” see the notes on Revelation 21:6.

Commentary on Roman 9.5  [2 Pages]
by John Schoenheit, Mark Graeser, John Lynn rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

The entire context of Romans 9:5 is describing God’s blessings to the Jews, who have a heritage of being aggressively monotheistic. An insert about Christ being God seems most inappropriate.

Commentary on Romans 10.9  [1 page]
by John Schoenheit, Mark Graeser, John Lynn rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

We must recognize that it was God who made Jesus “Lord.” Acts 2:36 says: “God has made this Jesus...both Lord and Christ.” If “Lord” equals “God,” then somehow God made Jesus “God,” which is something that even Trinitarians do not teach, because it is vital to Trinitarian doctrine that Jesus be co-equal and co-eternal with the Father.

Commentary on Romans 10.13  [2 Pages]
by John Schoenheit, Mark Graeser, John Lynn rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

The context of this verse in Romans makes it clear that the “Lord” referred to in this verse is the Lord Jesus Christ. However, this verse is a quotation from Joel 2:32 in the Old Testament, and in Joel the “Lord” is Yahweh. That has caused some Trinitarians to say that Jesus is God.

Commentary on Titus 2.13  [2 Pages]
by John Schoenheit, Mark Graeser, John Lynn rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

It makes perfect sense for Scripture to call Christ “the glory of God” and for the Bible to exhort us to say “no” to ungodliness in light of the coming of the Lord, which will be quickly followed by the Judgment (Matt. 25:31-33; Luke 21:36)

Critique of the Historical Godhead  [48 pages]
by K. Michael Errington rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

Many consider the configuration of the Trinity to have occurred in the Apostolic Age despite the word having never occurred inside the scriptures, much less any basic outline articulated by any of its authors. What is compelling is that any church historian with an ounce of integrity will recognize the basic configuration of the Central Doctrine to have developed over the course of centuries through ecumenical councils. More profound is the idea that eternal salvation rests on belief in this mysterious formula. The aim here is reduce the mysteriousness of the Central Doctrine’s development by uncovering decisions made by these ecumenical councils. History has a story to tell and if we look close enough more wonder should follow. There were 178 ecumenical councils between 263 and 431 A.D., yet the Catholic Church recognizes only 3 of these. The intention of this paper is to identify the historical development of the Central Doctrine and pinpoint the work that was overlooked at the Reformation.

Rethinking the Trinity  [27:13]
by Kenneth Milne rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

not available

The Restitution of Jesus Christ (Truth Matters)  [35:49]
by Kermit Zarley rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

"Servetus the Evangelical" is the pseudonym for an evangelical scholar who recently published a book called The Restitution of Jesus Christ in which he describes who God and Jesus are from a biblical unitarian perspective including exegesis of several texts typically used to teach that Jesus is God (i.e. John 1.1; 20.28; etc.). Though he has been a Bible-believing evangelical all his adult life he began to question the doctrine of the Trinity when he couldn't make sense of certain Scriptures within a trinitarian mindset. In particular Matthew 24.36 (also Mark 13.32) convinced him that Jesus was not omniscient since he confessed that he did not know when he would return. Texts like this began "Servetus" on a quest for truth which ended in his confession of the historic creed of the people of God that Yahweh alone is God (Deut. 6.4; Mark 12.29) and that Jesus is the human Messiah divinely begotten by God via the Holy Spirit.

"Servetus" has a website at which many articles are free for download including this tract which describes in a couple of pages what his research on God and Jesus has revealed. Furthermore, there is a contest on www.servetustheevangelical.com to guess his identity. Since 2008 he has revealed a clue each month. He will continue to do this until 2011 (the 500th birthday of Michael Servetus) when he will reveal his identity and publish a new book about his personal journey. Listen in to this conversation to hear the mysterious "Servetus the Evangelical" describe why he changed his views on these critical matters. (Thanks to JP Smajda--audio engineer extraordinaire--for your help in disguising Servetus' voice).

The Son of the Living God  [29:27]
by Matthew Janzen rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

This talk deals with Yeshua's identity based upon the revelation given to Peter as well as the birth narrative in Luke.

The Son is Subordinate  [29:27]
by Matthew Janzen rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

Trinitarians and Oneness believers have trouble saying that the Son is subordinate to the Father, but Paul's writing to the Corinthians reveals this to be factual.

Yahweh Has a Son  [29:14]
by Matthew Janzen rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

A sit down one to one conversation with a good friend that came out of a Trinitarian belief system. Basic Christology is discussed.

Principle of Agency  [28:46]
by Matthew Janzen rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

A continuation of the conversation called "Yahweh Cannot Die," the principle of agency among other concepts in Theology and Christology are covered.

Yahweh Cannot Die  [30:01]
by Matthew Janzen rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

Yeshua died for our sins and this simple fact proves that he cannot be Yahweh because Yahweh is the immortal, eternal God.

Did Jesus Volunteer to be our Savior?  [49:55]
by Mel Hershberger rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

A study of Philippians 2 and other relevant sections that are traditionally used to show that Christ volunteered to become a human to save us.

Is Jesus the Father?  [5 pages]
by Mike Hicks rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

Mike Hicks carefully analyzes the central claim of oneness theology that Jesus is the Father. He cites the work of Gordon Magee and David Bernard and then goes on to show that the oneness assertion, "Jesus is the Father," steps far outside of Biblical language and logic. In attempting to disprove the doctrine of the Trinity, which is also false, Jesus-only advocates prove too much.

Glorifying God's Name  [23:52]
by Mike Montgomery rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

Are you taking the time to truly honor the God who created each star "one by one?" A glimpse at why and how we should glorify our heavenly Father and bring praise to His name.

The Only God Is One Person  [5 pages]
by Ray Faircloth rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

For all the events recorded in the Scriptures there is no indication that some were performed by a Trinitarian version of "God the Father" in contrast to some being performed by other separate parts of God or the full Trinity.

Jesus Is Not The Almighty God  [9 pages]
by Ray Faircloth rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

...it is evident that the earlier quoted statement by William Barclay was correct when he said: “Nowhere does the New Testament identify Jesus with God.” So the final decision made by Emperor Constantine at the end of the Council of Nicea in A.D 325 established a doctrine of God and Jesus that is completely foreign to the teaching of the Holy Scriptures.

Answering Trinitarian Arguments   [16 pages]
by Ray Faircloth rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

When speaking of Jesus Trinitarians often forget that just as a human principal may use an agent so, too, God often uses agents. In the Bible the human principal/agent relationship can be seen from the account in Luke 7:1-10 concerning the centurion who sent Jewish elders to ask Jesus to heal his servant. Yet the parallel account in Matthew 8:5-13 presents the event as if the centurion were personally speaking to Jesus. Furthermore, God is shown to use Aaron as agent

More Inconsistencies In Trinitarianism   [7 page]
by Ray Faircloth rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

Since the 4th century Trinitarians have claimed to be monotheists; yet if they worship God as God the Father, God the Son, and God the Holy Spirit then 3 co-equal Gods are being worshipped, each God being a separate and distinct person. This is tritheism and not biblical monotheism. Yet this anomaly is covered over by stating that it is a mystery.

Jesus Was Not the Agent/Co-Creator of the Genesis Creation  [8 pages]
by Ray Faircloth rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

Evidently Jesus does act as God’s agent, but in producing the New Creation which does not bring about new material things (Please see STUDY 11). In being this agent, Jesus works in harmony with the Father and is therefore also the co-creator of the New Creation by virtue of his sacrifice.

Jesus is the Prototype and Agent of the New Creation  [9 pages]
by Ray Faircloth rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

The first thing to hold in mind is that only Yahweh was the creator of the Physical universe as shown from the Scriptures in the previous study. There are another half dozen Scriptures that also state that only Yahweh was the creator of the universe and dozens more which imply the same. However, a number of Scriptures directly inform us that Jesus is the creator of ‘the new creation’ inasmuch as his sacrifice reconciles humans to God and the new creation is the point of focus in Isaiah 51:16 which the Watchtower Bible and Tract Society (WBTS) of the Jehovah’s Witnesses, the Word Biblical Commentary, and the Fausset Commentary all recognize as applying, not to the Genesis creation, but to Messiah and the new heavens and earth.

What Does Pre-human Existence Really Mean?  [10 pages]
by Ray Faircloth rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

Jehovah’s Witnesses and the various Bible Student groups teach that Jesus, on earth, was fully human and was the equal of the pristine Adam. This teaching means that he was not a hybrid - part human/part spirit creature. Yet these denominations also teach that Jesus had a pre-human existence, having been created as a spirit before the Genesis creation. Then at the time of Jesus’ conception the spirit creature’s life was transferred to Mary’s womb. The Bible Student groups generally do not accept the Jehovah’s Witnesses teaching that Jesus was previously the archangel Michael; but nevertheless they believe that he previously was a spirit person existing in heaven.

John`s Portrait of Jesus  [14 pages]
by Ray Faircloth rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

Although John’s gospel was written last it cannot be maintained, that whilst the other gospels and writings do not speak of pre-existence, that John is providing a new revelation as to who Jesus was. Jesus never changed the Jewish definition of what the Messiah was to be i.e. a descendant of David.

One God  [35:35]
by Roger Cupp rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

There's no more fundamental truth than understanding exactly who is this God we worship. How can we worship a God we don't know? But why has so much of the world corrupted this simple truth?

Double Take: Answer to the Loaded Question  [36:34]
by Russ Magaw rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

Have you asked yourself who Jesus really is? Are you prepared for the answer? Does it make a difference in you?

One Hundred Scriptural Arguments for the Unitarian Faith  [7 pages]
by Samuel Barrett rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

100 biblical arguments that God is one (not three-in-one) from the early 19th century. Also available in French.

Who Do YOU Say That I Am?  [31:15]
by Scott Ross rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

Who do people say Jesus is? There are lots of opinions. But more personally, who do you say Jesus is? Jesus asked his disciples the same question. And the Apostle Peter gave the right answer. It should be the same answer for us today. Jesus was no ordinary man. He was "the Christ, the son of the living God." How will that fact change your life? Scriptures: Matthew 16:13-17; Psalm 2; Psalm 42

Jesus had a Beginning  [4 pages]
by Sean Finnegan rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

Did Jesus have a beginning? Has he always existed? Read this article to get an understanding of the 'begotten' texts. It may surprise you to discover that the Bible teaches.

Some Thoughts on Isaiah 9:6  [2 pages]
by Sean Finnegan rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

Many people have seen this verse as the proof-text of Jesus' divinity in the Old Testament. Even though this verse has traditionally been argued in this direction, Christian thinkers are now starting to break new ground by taking into consideration the historical context of the prophecy. One resource that has discovered a new understanding of this verse is the NET Bible (New English Translation). Remarkably this Trinitarian study Bible contains stunning insights into what Isaiah 9.6 is really saying.

A Short Explanation to John 1.1, 14  [1 page]
by Sean Finnegan rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

What is the word in John 1.1? This question is best answered by looking at the 42 books of the Bible which preceded the Gospel of John rather than reading later extra-biblical logos Christology into the Bible.

A Short Explanation to Titus 2.13  [1 page]
by Sean Finnegan rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

This verse could be translated two different ways. The way the NASB translates it implies that Christ Jesus is "our great God and Savior." Though this translation is very popular some scholars have criticized it and prefer the rendering found in the NAB and the KJV "...the glory of the great God and of our Savior Jesus Christ."

Scholars Speak on John 1.18  [2 pages]
by Sean Finnegan rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

Brief excerpts from biblical schoalrs J.A.T. Robinson, Bart D. Ehrman, and Timothy Paul Jones explaining John 1.18. Which manuscript tradition is better--"only begotten Son" or "only begotten God"?

Scholars Speak on 2 Thessalonians 1.12  [1 page]
by Sean Finnegan rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

Is Jesus called God in 2 Thessalonians 1:12? Raymond Brown comments on the options.

Scholars Speak on Acts 20.28  [1 page]
by Sean Finnegan rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

Whose blood is referred to in this verse: God's or Jesus'? Raymond Brown briefly explains the possibilities.

Scholars Speak on 1 John 5.20  [1 page]
by Sean Finnegan rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

Does this text call Jesus "the true God and eternal life"? J.E. Huthe, Glen W. Barker, and John W. Stott comment on the best interpretation of this text.

A Very Short Explanation of Hebrews 1.8  [<1 page]
by Sean Finnegan rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

The key to understanding Hebrews 1:8 is to recognize that it is a quotation from Psalm 45:6-7 where the king of Israel is called "God" in a representational sense.

A Very Short Explanation of Jesus' Miracles  [<1 page]
by Sean Finnegan rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

Although Jesus did amazing miracles, it was not because he was God, but because God was at work within him.

A Very Short Explanation of John 1.18  [<1 page]
by Sean Finnegan rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

Is Jesus called the only begotten God or the only begotten Son? It depends on which translation you read. Read this super short introduction to the manuscript variations on John 1:18

A Very Short Explanation of John 5.18  [<1 page]
by Sean Finnegan rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

Did Jesus came to be God? His Jewish opponents thought so, but should we take their word for it or listen to Jesus' response a verse later?

A Very Short Explanation of John 10.30  [<1 page]
by Sean Finnegan rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

Jesus and the Father are one in the task of caring for their sheep, not one in substance.

A Very Short Explanation of John 12.41  [<1 page]
by Sean Finnegan rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

Was John referring to the vision of Isaiah 6 or was he referring to the glory of Isaiah 52-53?

A Very Short Explanation of John 17.5, 24  [<1 page]
by Sean Finnegan rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

Jesus had glory stored up with God before he was born. God loved Jesus even before he was born.

A Very Short Explanation of John 20.28  [<1 page]
by Sean Finnegan rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

Thomas calls Jesus "God" because he is God's supreme agent who represents God to us.

A Very Short Explanation of Matthew 1.23  [<1 page]
by Sean Finnegan rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

Jesus is Immanuel, which means "God is with us." This does not mean Jesus is God, but that Jesus' birth signifies the fact that God is with us; he has not abandoned his people.

A Very Short Explanation of Matthew 28.19  [<1 page]
by Sean Finnegan rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

Is Matthew 28.19 the earliest teaching on the Trinity?

A Very Short Explanation of Micah 5.2  [<1 page]
by Sean Finnegan rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

Did Jesus exist from eternity or is a Hebrew idiom employed in Micah 5:2?

A Very Short Explanation of Romans 9.5  [<1 page]
by Sean Finnegan rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

Is Paul calling Jesus God or is he praising the Father in Romans 9:5?

The Most high and His Son  [3 pages]
by Shane Derry rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

This article shows the differences scripturally between God and the Son of God. It shows and explains how they are completely separate people. This shows harmony with the verses of the Old and New Testaments without involving post Apostolic man-made creeds built on confusion and contradictions.

2 Corinthians 13.14  [46:25]
by Steve Katsaras rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

Steve Katsaras explains 2 Corinthians 13.14

1 Timothy 3.16  [54:13]
by Steve Katsaras rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

Steve Katsaras explains 1 Timothy 3.16

Acts 20.28  [46:52]
by Steve Katsaras rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

Steve Katsaras explains Acts 20.28

John 10.33  [64:11]
by Steve Katsaras rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

Steve Katsaras explains John 10.33

John 20.28  [67:07]
by Steve Katsaras rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

Steve Katsaras explains John 20.28

Matthew 1.23  [58:48]
by Steve Katsaras rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

Steve Katsaras explains Matthew 1.23

Romans 9.5  [55:34]
by Steve Katsaras rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

Steve Katsaras explains Romans 9.5

Deuteronomy 6.4  [52:03]
by Steve Katsaras rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

Steve Katsaras explains Deuteronomy 6.4

Genesis 1.1  [37:40]
by Steve Katsaras rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

Steve Katsaras explains Genesis 1.1

I Am Almighty God  [65:45]
by Steve Katsaras rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

Steve Katsaras speaks on the subject "I am almighty God"

Incarnation  [67:33]
by Steve Katsaras rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

Steve Katsaras speaks on the incarnation.

Matthew 3.16  [54:01]
by Steve Katsaras rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

Steve Katsaras explains Matthew 3.16

The Truth about the Truth-Giver  [22:10]
by Steve Taylor rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

no description available

Is That Old-Time Religion Sufficient for Today?  [29:59]
by Wally Winner rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

In this series on the book of Acts, we're examining the church of the first-century Christians and what we can learn from this dedicated fellowship of believers today. Paul was confronted with polytheism when he stood on Mars Hill in Athens and taught about the Unknown God. It was from this pagan culture that many falsehoods about God developed. Christ died believing the same promises as all of us: that He would be resurrected by his Father to immortality. We live and die with the same hope. This is the "Old Time Religion". This is the religion of the Apostles and disciples of the early church.

The Son of God  [47:25]
by Walter Wiggins rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

National Church of God evangelist Walter Wiggins doesn't hold back speaking to a crowd, including lots of community visitors, at this service emphasizing the character and characteristics of God's only begotten son, Jesus.

The Form of God (Philippians 2.5-11)  [6 pages]
by William Wachtel rated at 1.0 (5 votes so far)

A very straightforward explanation of Philippians 2.5-11 from a biblical unitarian perspective.



resource center menu   
choose a subject [ 1 ] 
choose a speaker [ 2 ] 
choose a ministry [ 3 ] 
choose a scripture [ 4 ] 
show me the top ten [ 5 ] 
show me the debates [ 6 ] 
show me everything [ 7 ] 

We now have a total of 373 media items including video, audio, and text. If you would like to submit an article or media file to our collection, click here. All files are free to download.



books

These books, written by people from diverse backgrounds, express the simple truth that God is one. Some of them are more scholary while others are more autobiographical. In addition, a few of them are available to read online. If you would like more in depth treatment of christian monotheism, these books are the next step to take. Note: if you know of other books, not listed here, please leave us feedback.

home | media center | get involved | contact info